Ursuline News

Faculty News: Accomplishments and Accolades
Faculty News: Accomplishments and Accolades

Dave Beyreis's love for history is varied and vast.

The Ursuline teacher, who teaches Historical Geography and AP U.S. History, published "The Chaos of Conquest: The Bents and the Problem of American Expansion, 1846-1849" in Kansas History: A Journal of the Central Plains. The piece looks at the decline and fall of an American trading company in Colorado during the period of the U.S.-Mexican War.

"I argue that American expansion helped unleash the violence and environmental collapse that undermined the profitability of the firm," Beyreis said. "The wonderful thing about history is that it can be truly interdisciplinary. You can analyze politics, gender, and ecology to reach your conclusions."

His other work — "'If You Had Fought Bravely, I Would Have Sung for You': Women and Cheyenne War Culture" and "Dangerous Alliances in the New Mexico Borderlands, 1837-1847: Charles Bent and the Limits of Family Networks" — will appear soon in Montana: The Magazine of Western History and the Journal of the Early Republic, the top scholarly publication for early American history.

"Teaching at a girls' school has inspired me to put women's history at the center of much of my work," he said. "It's interesting to analyze the ways Plains Indian women used warfare to benefit themselves and examine how American businessmen used marriage to form the political and economic alliances they needed to be successful in northern Mexico during the early nineteenth century."

Other highlights:

English

Dr. Stephen da Silva's proposal, "'What a Strange Name for a Dog': Hugh Walpole's Appropriation and Revision of Hamlet" has been accepted by the American Names Society conference which is being held in conjunction with the Linguistic Society of America conference in January in New York. Stephen will travel to NYC to present.

Sarette Albin's poem "Migration" won the 2018 Best of Poetry Award for the Texas Association of Creative Writing Teachers (TACWT). She will be reading her poem at the annual TACWT conference in September, and "Migration" will be published in their annual literary magazine.

Library

Librarian Renee Chevallier earned an Advanced Certificate in Archives and Records Management. She worked with the Dallas Holocaust Museum archives this summer, and in October, Ursuline's archives will have a space at the DFW Archives Bazaar at the Dallas Heritage Village.

Physical Education

Stephanie Zorn played in a life-changing football game.

Fans packed the stands in Fair Park to cheer for their favorite blondes and brunettes at the 11th annual BvB Dallas Powder-Puff Football Game, which helped raise funds to tackle Alzheimer's disease. Zorn raised $1,625 for the cause.

"I was overwhelmed with gratitude and excitement," Zorn said. "It was an amazing experience, and I can't wait to participate again next summer."

Science

Dr. Hillary Kasbarian was a Master Teacher for UT-Southwestern's STARS Summer Biology Camp for Teachers in June. The biology, microbiology, and immunology teacher developed lab experiments and co-coached 10 high school teachers through those lab experiments.

Technology

Natalie Buxkember and Robert Zamora are official Microsoft Innovative Educator Experts (MIEE). The duo joins 465 experts in the United States, including only 44 in Texas.

Each year, Microsoft selects innovative educators to share ideas, try new approaches, and learn from each other as a global community dedicated to improving student outcomes through technology.

The application process included demonstrating how they use innovation in the classroom. Buxkemper and Zamora have also completed the Microsoft Trainer certification and support the staff by offering training throughout the year.

Ursuline was first selected as a Microsoft Showcase School in February. The school joined an exclusive community of more than 850 premier schools from around the world, recognized for pioneering efforts and innovation in rethinking teaching and learning.

Visual Arts

Sarah Francis will compete in an Ironman this month in Chattanooga, Tennessee to honor the memory of her grandmother. Francis raised $5,600 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.