Courses

Course work at Ursuline is designed to develop critical thinking and creative problem-solving skills. Classes nurture intellectual curiosity and engage students in a learning process that will bring new ideas to life. There are many ways to develop your intellectual gifts at Ursuline. Learn to speak and write effectively. Take classes that encourage a love of subjects from English to math and beyond. Develop skills of research and scientific investigation. Use advanced technology as a learning tool in all areas. Become more aware of the responsibilities of global citizenship and ways you can have a positive impact on our global society.

Ursuline Academy’s outstanding college preparatory curriculum offers Honors and AP courses in every core subject area. Choose from a wide variety of interesting electives, from Mandarin Chinese and Economics to Contemporary Issues and advanced math and science courses.

Prior to enrollment, students consult with their counselors concerning curriculum choices and requirements. All students must be enrolled in a minimum of six (6) credits during the official school day in each semester. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) require an application process that will be discussed in course selection meetings scheduled during Advisory.

In addition to viewing course information above you may download the Course Compendium 2020-21 PDF and Course Progression Charts 2020-21.

 

2020-21 Course Listings

Computer Science

The Computer Science Department offers a variety of courses in which students learn to organize ideas, develop algorithms, and employ problem-solving techniques.  Students will apply these skills, in combination with their creativity, to produce solutions that will affect positive change in a technological world.

3631 Introduction to Computer Science

(Sophomore-Senior) This core semester course provides students with an introduction to computer architecture, networking and problem solving through programming. Using a high-level programming language, students learn how to read, modify, design, debug, and test algorithms that solve problems. Programming concepts include control structures, abstraction, modularity, and object-oriented design. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills to solve real-world problems. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

3632 Digital Graphics and Animation Design and Development

(Sophomore-Senior) This semester course will foster students' creativity and innovation by presenting opportunities to design, implement, and present stories and animations using software and a modern programming language. Students will learn how to debug and solve problems to achieve their intended programming goal. Object oriented environments will introduce the student to computer science concepts such as sequence-programming, loops, selection structures, and variables.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science — 1 semester — ½ credit

3637 Engineering Design Innovation

(Junior-Senior) Students learn how engineers create, design, and test technologies and devices of the 21st Century using math, science, computer science, and creative skills. Students learn multiple problem-solving strategies including Design Thinking, the 6 Ds, and the Engineering Design Process to solve real-world problems, build prototypes, and test their solutions. Students learn through classroom discussions and hands-on design projects. Students spend 80% of instructional time conducting engineering field and laboratory activities. The activities include mechanical engineering (robotics and rockets), civil engineering (drafting, architecture and construction), systems and logistics, computer engineering (digital logic design, programming, and 3D printed structures), and biomedical engineering.

Prerequisite: Physics I — Co-requisite: Algebra II — Juniors receive one computer science credit. Seniors receive one science elective credit or computer science credit. 2 semesters — 1 credit

3639 Introduction to Java Programming

(Sophomore-Senior) This semester-long course introduces fundamental object-oriented concepts using the Java programming language. Students will learn concepts such as data types, variables, method design and control flow. Best programming practices are emphasized as students design, code, and problem solve real-world applications.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science —1 semester — ½ credit

3655 Introduction to Python Programming

(Sophomore-Senior) Python is quickly becoming the go-to language for universities as a first class in computer science, the most widely used programming language in industry, the preferred language for applications in data science, artificial intelligence, robotics and web development.   This course is a semester-long course introducing fundamental programming concepts using the Python programming language. Students will learn concepts such as data types, variables, function design and control flow. Best programming practices are emphasized as students design, code, and problem solve real-world applications.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science —1 semester — ½ credit

3628 AP Computer Science A

(Sophomore-Senior) This year-long course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. These techniques represent proven approaches for developing solutions that can scale up from small, simple problems to large, complex problems. The AP Computer Science A course curriculum is compatible with many CS1 courses in colleges and universities.

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval — Co-requisite: Algebra II/Precalculus Honors or completion of Algebra II — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3641 AP Computer Science Principles

(Sophomore-Senior) This year-long course is compatible with the curriculum specified by College Board and offers a multidisciplinary approach to teaching the underlying principles of computation. The course will introduce students to the creative aspects of programming, abstractions, algorithms, large data sets, the Internet, cybersecurity concerns, and computing impacts. AP Computer Science Principles also gives students the opportunity to use current technologies to create computational artifacts for both self-expression and problem solving. Together, these aspects of the course make up a rigorous and rich curriculum that aims to broaden participation in computer science.

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3660 Computer Science Advanced Topics Honors

(Junior-Senior) Building on the foundations of AP Computer Science A, this advanced course will provide students the opportunity to study the analysis and design of fundamental data structures.  Students will program using the Python language and its data structure libraries to explore lists, tuples, dictionaries, strings, sets and frozen sets.  In addition, students will implement solutions related to artificial intelligence, data analysis, sorting algorithms, and database applications.

Prerequisite: AP Computer Science A and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgressionComputerScience

English

The English Department cultivates lifelong readers and creative, independent thinkers, preparing students to engage empathetically and meaningfully in their various communities, prompting them to seek and analyze information, develop their own opinions, and skillfully convey their perspectives to others—both verbally and in writing.  An Ursuline English graduate reflects on media, her own learning, and her relationship to culture and the human experience.

5131 English I

(Freshman) This course is designed to help students learn the fundamentals of effective writing, emphasizing reading and discussion to develop not only content for writing but also personal voice. Thematically the course will consider the hero’s journey as a metaphor for self-discovery. Students will practice paragraph writing by developing a main idea, using supporting examples accompanied by critical commentary. This process will lead to the development of full-length essays through process writing and timed writing. In addition, this course is designed to introduce the students to the UA library resources, both print and online, by having students produce an annotated bibliography that follows MLA formatting. Ongoing study of grammar and vocabulary accompanies each reading assignment, emphasizing learning words in context and by association. In the second semester, all English I students will be given a grammar and usage test (standardized by the department) in order to evaluate their mastery of basic skills.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5111 English I Honors

(Freshman) This course is designed to help students master the principles of sophisticated writing and in-depth literary analysis. Students will read, discuss, and analyze texts in a variety of genres including epic poetry, drama, and fiction. Students will engage extensively in the writing process, producing analytical essays, personal reflections, and annotated bibliographies. Thematically the course will consider the hero’s journey as a metaphor for self-discovery. In addition, this course is designed to introduce students to the UA library resources, both print and online. Ongoing instruction will be provided in both grammar and vocabulary which will be evaluated in the second semester via a grammar and usage exam (standardized by the department).

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5232 English II

(Sophomore) This course, The Female Voice, will explore common themes concerning women apparent through female authors and protagonists represented by a wide range of diverse cultural backgrounds which may include Asian, African, European, and Latina to offer students many perspectives on the female voice. The course narrows the freshman year’s journey theme into that of women’s journey towards identity. To develop analytical skills, sophomores incorporate literary analysis and literary terminology into multi-paragraph essays examining themes related to women. By applying the skills learned through analysis and the study of grammar usage, the students scrutinize their essays for content and style through the writing and revisions process. Furthermore, the students write a documented essay dealing with women’s experiences to incorporate their developing research skills into an essay.

Prerequisite: English l — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5212 English II Honors

(Sophomore) This course, The Female Voice, will explore common themes concerning women apparent through female authors and protagonists represented by a wide range of diverse cultural backgrounds which may include Asian, African, European, and Latina to offer students many perspectives on the female voice. The course narrows the freshman year’s journey theme into that of women’s journey towards identity, exploring more difficult works than English II. Students for this course have demonstrated confidence in analysis, writing, and reading skills. Working at an accelerated pace, honors students will be expected to craft multi-paragraph literary analyses each quarter. Using writing as a process through which students can articulate their ideas more clearly, they will also gain experience in revising and editing their own work as well as the work of others. These students will be encouraged to read beyond the curriculum, as well as to complete a documented essay dealing with women’s experiences as reflected in the course.

Prerequisite: English l Honors or English I and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5338 English III: American Voices

(Junior) In the 1760s, Hector St. John de Crèvecouer, a French immigrant and naturalized New York citizen, famously posed the question: “What then is the American, this new (wo)man?” This course will explore answers to this question, considering how the complex category “American” has been both imagined and challenged in a diverse range of American voices and genres. We will actively explore such themes as identity, individualism, the American dream, and tensions between inclusion and exclusion to determine what defines Americans, American literature, and the American experience. Students will be expected to write a documented essay and will also hone their writing skills in a variety of areas: literary analysis, the argumentative essay, and the personal essay. Greater emphasis on complex, thesis-driven essays, as well as on long-term reading assignments, will further prepare them for college-level work. Class discussions, various forms of writing, and creative projects will provide students an opportunity to think and respond critically and analytically. Potential thematic threads for this course could include: Constructed Communities, American Style and Rhetoric, the American Dream, and Public Conversation.

Prerequisite: English II — 2 semester — 1 credit

5313 English III Honors

(Junior) The course, Literature of the United States Honors, will explore the diverse voices in literature from the United States to determine what defines the American experience from a variety of viewpoints. We will examine such themes as the immigrant experience, slavery and its impact on literature, freedom, independence, and the American Dream. Each student will hone her writing skills in a variety of areas and will focus on analytical and critical thinking and writing. Students are expected to discuss these works, write, and analyze to the high standard of an honors class.

Prerequisite: English II Honors or English II and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5302 AP English Language and Composition

(Junior-Senior) This is a college-level course which combines extensive instruction and practice of writing with the study of American fiction and non-fiction. The readings serve as a springboard to discussion and analysis of American thought and voice, as well as provide illustrative models for the student's ongoing understanding of language and its use. Students will write in a variety of modes (including expository, analytical, argumentative, and personal) for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students will develop an understanding of writing and language while striving to develop a lucid, individualized writing style. The course prepares students for the AP Language and Composition College Board exam.

Prerequisite: English II Honors or English II and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5435 English IV: The Awokening: Gender Archetype or Sexist Stereotype?

(Senior) This course is an extension of the foundation of “The Female Voice” and women’s literature that students were introduced to as sophomores. This course elevates the discussion of women’s issues, explores how these issues have evolved over time and remained issues that women continue to grapple with in contemporary life, and attempts to answer the question of whether writers, when portraying female characters, employ gender archetypes or sexist stereotypes. The course will focus on female characters who fulfill a gender archetype and/or sexist stereotype and challenge the beliefs and expectations of that role and society. This course will also provide students with an understanding of how feminism has evolved over time and how to enter the contemporary conversation of gender using their own voices as young women.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5440 English IV: Foodie Lit: The Natural World and the Community of Food

(Senior) This portfolio-based course will explore how literature addresses humans’ relationship with the natural world, and how our stewardship and investment in our environment is related to our cultivation of food and community. The class will begin with a study of eco-literature and discuss themes related to humanity and empathy, perspective, voice, and using language to both describe and advocate for nature. During the second semester, the class will explore international and local issues regarding food cultivation and preparation, including themes such as the ethics of food cultivation, community, culture, creativity, and storytelling. Students will be makers of writing, gardens, and recipes in this course, with special focus on a research essay of choice on contemporary topics in the environment and food, literary analysis of contemporary environmental literature, as well as texts such as food blogs, podcasts, news and features, and travel writing.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5445 English IV: Gods Behaving Badly: Greek Myths and Their Modern Retellings

(Senior) “Gods Behaving Badly” will explore the influence of Greek mythology on modern literature Students will We will begin the year by clarifying the definition and purpose of myth. Then, they will study myths in which Greek gods wreaked havoc on the lives of mortals. With each myth students read, they will also examine a modern retelling of it. These modern interpretations will cover a range of genres: poetry, short story, fiction, and film. Throughout the course, students will get the chance to: 1) create their own versions of Greek myths; 2) research the influence of myths on societal values...and vice versa; and 3) compile a writing portfolio.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5450 English IV: Reading in the Dark: An Exploration of the Gothic, Horror, Mystery and Suspense

(Senior) From vampires and ghosts to jewel thieves and murderers, readers have been entranced with mystery and the morbid since the 18th century. In this course, students will explore core themes found in Gothic literature and many of the genres that evolved from its foundation in order to better understand the human fascination with fear and the grotesque. Additional genres will include mystery, horror, thriller and suspense. The class  will also investigate the impact these works have had on modern culture and artistic expression in other mediums. By the end of the course, the students will gain an appreciation for the complex nature of dark fiction and what it reveals about the existential questions that plague humanity.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5405 AP English Literature and Composition: Literature Explores Human Experience

(Senior) Telling stories is pretty much the oldest human activity.  We have always needed stories of all sorts to process our experiences and understand what it means to be human.  Directly or indirectly, realistically or fantastically, humans use stories to consider all the huge experiences, wonderful, traumatic, or damaging, that they encounter.  From war to love, this course will explore the big experiences and questions that any individual person can undergo.  

Prerequisite: English III Honors or AP English Language and Composition or English III and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5408 AP English Literature and Composition: Shakespearean Adaptations, Conversations, (& Bastardizations)

(Senior) Shakespeare was arguably the best adaptor of stories the world has known. Of his thirty-eight plays, all are adaptations of existing stories. The Bard borrowed from authors as exalted as Boccaccio and Plutarch, and sources as sordid as sailors. And in the true cycle of literature, his work has been adapted and borrowed by countless writers, directors, and others. Yet for centuries now we have created hundreds of adaptations of Shakespeare’s work, which –using methods from costume, to musical setting, to translation, to paraphrase – alter that which is arguably most Shakespearean: his words.  This course focuses on the question of who owns a story and what effect media has on that story, and the power of adaptation to change and create meaning. Alternating between close reading Shakespeare’s work (and forms), the works that inspired him, and the works that to this day seek to join his conversation, this writing and portfolio class will also have performance and directorial opportunities. 

Prerequisite: English III Honors or AP English Language and Composition or English III and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5410 AP English Literature and Composition: Schrodinger’s Cat and Other Concerns in Writing

(Senior) There is a tired cliché that describes reading as an act of transportation. We escape through reading, are transported to other worlds, other places, other planes. We see new perspectives, hear new stories of ourselves, of being human. Stories about going down life’s rabbit holes and the strange topsy-turvy mirrored realities that can only exist in fiction. But these transportations are also invitations for the reader to get carried away and lost in a thought; invitations to explore the way(s) the world means and the way we mean within it. This course will take up this invitation and explore stories about getting lost (and getting found), stories about language, time, dimension, ghosts and monsters, and all the in-betweens. Students will be required to read complex works of literature including some philosophy and mixed-medium works and will complete a variety of assignments that include written essays, creative essays, fiction and non-fiction, self-selected reading lists (to name a few). Accordingly, students will need strong reading, writing, and critical thinking practices and the self-discipline fitting of an AP student. 

Prerequisite: English III Honors or AP English Language and Composition or English III and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5667 U.S. Protest Literature

(Junior-Senior) In perhaps one of the most famous social protest documents, Civil Disobedience, Henry David Thoreau reminds us that “unjust laws exist,” encouraging us to “let [our lives] be a counter-friction to stop the machine.” His assertion asks us: how do we confront injustice? This course will actively explore answers to this question through the history of United States protest literature, contextualizing it in the larger dialogue of U.S. History. As a class community, we will work to determine what defines protest literature: is it only a genre that criticizes society? Should it also, implicitly or explicitly, provide a solution? Is it a mode and style of social analysis? Texts will include a wide variety of genres, including prose, film, photography, poetry, and music, and student-driven issues could include environmentalism, education, civil rights, women’s rights, immigration, class, and individual conscience. And while protest literature has a long intellectual history, beginning with the Hebrew midwives, this class will focus on United States protest literature, from Thomas Paine to Tupac and beyond. Students will read primary sources and confront both current and historical issues. The class will include discussions, various forms of writing, and creative projects to provide students with opportunities to think and respond critically and analytically about what protest means to them, especially as global citizens committed to service and social justice.

Prerequisite: None  — 1 semester — ½ Social Studies credit  or ½ English credit

5654 Creative Writing

(Sophomore-Senior) This elective course provides a forum for students seeking an opportunity for written self-expression and an opportunity to develop skills to enhance the power and clarity of that expression. The course will focus on two specific areas of creative writing: poetry and short fiction. Much of the class will employ a workshop format in which activities include modeling, class discussion, and peer review. Essential to the success of the class is the willingness of students to submit their work to the critical response of their peers, as well as their ability to evaluate candidly the work of those same peers.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

5711 Journalism

(Freshman-Junior) This elective course is designed to increase students' understanding of the communication process within the context of journalistic writing and page design. Students will develop research and documentation skills while applying their ability to conduct interviews to obtain information and to verify facts. They will also learn to discern credible sources and to recognize the positive and negative effects of digital media and interactive journalism. In addition to writing skills, students will develop page layouts incorporating design elements in page production using computer software packages including InDesign, Photoshop 7.0, Illustrator 7.0, and Adobe CS, version 6. This journalism course also focuses on the impact of the Internet on the news, studying and contributing to newspapers online, and investigating other forms of modern media from podcasts to blogs.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5721 Newspaper Journalism

(Sophomore-Senior) This elective course is a laboratory class for journalism students to design and produce a publication that serves the school community. Students will build interview skills to gather information and use direct quotes from participants to report the news. Using Adobe InDesign publishing software, students will apply their design skills to the page production process. In addition to the computer and writing skills used, students will study and practice components of photojournalism, business management, and advertising to complete the project. The class is also responsible for the school’s online newspaper and its constant updating with stories, pictures, and videos. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Journalism I or Instructor Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

5731 Yearbook Journalism

(Sophomore-Senior) Throughout this elective laboratory course, students will apply the basic skills of design and copy writing learned in Journalism I as they pertain to this type of publication. The magazine format and graphic design require good photograph editing and cropping skills to create designs that are visually appealing and effective. This class may be repeated for credit

Prerequisites: Journalism I and Instructor Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgression-English

Life Skills

The Life Skills courses cultivate students who focus not only on academics but also on resiliency, grit, and communication skills. We want our students to embody Serviam, exemplify integrity, and engage with others ethically, critically, and empathetically.

9005/9010 Life Skills

(Freshman, Junior) This class equips students with a strong foundation of lifelong social, mental, and practical competencies. Students gain knowledge and skills to prepare them for any of their future life paths once they leave Ursuline.  The class includes guest speakers and the wisdom and expertise from a variety of Ursuline teachers.  Students demonstrate mastery of topics with a hands-on activity and class projects.

At the junior level, topics may include personal finance, digital leadership, self-defense, defining personal values, life hacks, and resolving conflict. At the freshman level, topics may include media use, organization and study skills, interpersonal communication, and life balance

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

*Note: Life Skills is a required class for the class of 2024.  For the classes of 2021-2023, the course may be taken for elective credit.

Mathematics

The Mathematics Department strives to develop students’ mathematical analysis and critical thinking skills so that they can confidently pursue their goals and explore diverse fields of interests.  In tandem with developing a strong mathematical foundation is the hope that students will come to value the beauty of mathematics in nature along with the purity of mathematical analysis, so they can provide unbiased context and validation to the challenges they will face in the world.

3132 Algebra I/Geometry Year 1

(Freshman) This two-year course integrates content typically covered in a traditional Algebra 1 and Geometry sequence. The integration of the two branches of mathematics allows students to see the connections between the two disciplines and reinforce understandings. Topics include linear and quadratic functions, Euclidean geometry, algebraic manipulation and problem solving, and right-triangle trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on communication, justification, and real-world applications. Technology is incorporated into the learning activities when applicable and used to enforce conceptual understanding.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3136 Algebra I/Geometry Honors Year 1

(Freshman) This two-year course integrates content typically covered in a traditional Algebra I Honors and Geometry Honors sequence. The integration of the two branches of mathematics allows students to see the connections between the two disciplines and reinforce understandings. Students conduct an in-depth analysis of functions, algebraic manipulation and problem solving, and right-triangle trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on communication, justification, and real-world applications. Technology is incorporated into the learning activities when applicable and used to enforce conceptual understanding. Students should be capable of making mathematical inferences and understanding technical mathematical language. There is an emphasis on independent work.

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3134 Algebra I/Geometry Year 2

(Sophomore) This course is a continuation of a two-year course that integrates content typically covered in a traditional Algebra I and Geometry sequence. The integration of the two branches of mathematics allows students to see the connections between the two disciplines and reinforce understandings. Topics include linear and quadratic functions, Euclidean geometry, algebraic manipulation and problem solving, volume and surface area analysis, and right-triangle trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on communication, justification, and real-world applications. Technology is incorporated into the learning activities when applicable and used to enforce conceptual understanding.

Prerequisite: Algebra I/Geometry Year 1 — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3138 Algebra I/Geometry Honors Year 2

(Sophomore) This course is a continuation of a two-year course that integrates content typically covered in a traditional Algebra I Honors and Geometry Honors sequence. The integration of the two branches of mathematics allows students to see the connections between the two disciplines and reinforce understandings. Students conduct an in-depth analysis of functions, Euclidean geometry algebraic manipulation and problem solving, volume and surface area analysis, and right-triangle trigonometry. Emphasis is placed on communication, justification, and real-world applications. Technology is incorporated into the learning activities when applicable and used to enforce conceptual understanding. Students should be capable of making mathematical inferences and understanding technical mathematical language. Students are expected to critically think and apply concepts into real world scenarios. There is an emphasis on independent work.

Prerequisite: Algebra I/Geometry Honors Year 1 or Algebra I/Geometry Year 1 and Departmental approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3212 Geometry Honors

(Freshman-Sophomore) This course covers a more in-depth examination of the content covered in a regular Geometry course. Students analyze plane, solid, and coordinate geometry as they relate to both abstract mathematical concepts as well as real-world problem situations. Topics include logic and proof, parallel lines and polygons, perimeter and area analysis, volume and surface area analysis, similarity and congruence, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. Weight is placed on developing critical thinking skills as they relate to logical reasoning and argument. Students should be capable of making mathematical inferences and understanding the technical language of mathematics. There is emphasis on independent work.

Prerequisite: Departmental approval — 2 semesters —1 credit

3333 Algebra II

(Sophomore-Junior) This course continues development of the student's ability to recognize, represent and solve problems involving functions and equations, emphasizing relationships between algebra and geometry. With modeling and use of technology playing key roles, students explore functions (including linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, and logarithmic), data analysis, systems of equations and inequalities, introduction to probability and statistics, and sequences and series.

Prerequisite: Algebra l/Geometry Year 2 — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3334 Algebra II Honors

(Sophomore-Junior) This course encompasses all aspects of the Algebra II course and provides an opportunity for students to delve deeply into the concepts with an application perspective.  Integral to the program is an emphasis on mathematical processes that underlie the content: computation in problem-solving contexts, language and communications, connections within and outside mathematics, reasoning, justification and proof, and applications and modeling.

Prerequisite: Algebra 1/Geometry Year 2 Honors or Algebra I/Geometry Year 2 and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3335 Algebra II/Precalculus Honors

(Sophomore-Junior) This course combines algebraic and trigonometric concepts into a preparatory course for calculus. Arithmetic and geometric sequences and series and the binomial theorem are developed and applied. Matrices and linear programming are used to model and analyze real-world scenarios. Complex numbers are introduced. Exponential, logarithmic, linear, polynomial, and rational function transformations are analyzed with emphasis on graphing and interpreting intercepts, minimum and maximum values, end behaviors, and domain and range. Trigonometry, trigonometric functions and their inverses are evaluated for domain and range and applied to the unit circle and sinusoidal curve fitting. Trigonometric identities and equations are studied for their application in sum and difference formulas, double and half angle formulas. Students are expected to strengthen symbolic and verbal fluency and to study both independently and collaboratively.

Prerequisite: Algebra I/Geometry Honors Year 2 or Geometry Honors and Departmental approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3614 Precalculus

(Junior-Senior) This course examines the concepts of composite, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Laws associated with each class of function are explored, as well as applications of these laws. Topics also include the Law of Sines and Cosines and conic sections.  The concepts necessary for preparing for calculus are examined including limits. Importance is placed on graphing techniques as a precursor to Calculus.

Prerequisite: Algebra ll — 2 semesters —1 credit

3615 Precalculus Honors

(Sophomore-Senior) This course examines the concepts of composite, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, parametric, and polar functions.  Laws associated with each class of function are explored, as well as applications of these laws. Topics also include the Law of Sines and Cosines, conic sections, vectors, and complex numbers.  Limits as a foundation for calculus are explored and developed. Emphasis is placed on providing both algebraic and graphical representations to fully demonstrate and solve problems with appropriate use of technology.   

Prerequisite:  Algebra II Honors or Algebra II and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters —1 credit

3432 Statistics

(Senior) This introductory course emphasizes work with data and statistical ideas. The areas covered include data analysis with graphical and numerical examination of distributions and relationships, producing data using random sampling and randomized comparative experiments, and sampling distributions and probability. There is also a study of statistical inference starting with an introduction to confidence levels, significance tests, and errors, extending into inference for distribution and proportions. Importance is placed on active learning in the development of statistical thinking and understanding of data concepts. Technology is integrated throughout the course, with instruction using the statistics feature of the graphing calculator.

Prerequisite: Algebra ll — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3404 AP Statistics

(Junior-Senior) This elective course is an in-depth study of the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students examine broad conceptual themes: exploratory analysis of data, with use of graphical and numerical techniques to study patterns and departures from patterns; planning a study with emphasis on data collection, modeling, and validity of conjectures obtained; probability, the tool used for describing distributions of data in modeling; statistical inferences starting with confidence levels, significance tests and errors, and then investigating inference for distributions and proportions, followed by more advanced topics in inference. Technology is integrated throughout the course with instructions utilizing the statistics features of the graphing calculator as well as statistical software. Independent projects will be required. Strong verbal ability is recommended. The course prepares students for the AP Statistics College Board exam.

Prerequisite: Concurrently with Algebra II/Precalculus Honors or higher-level course — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3401 Calculus

(Junior-Senior) Students will investigate elementary calculus including differentiation and integration with algebraic, graphical, and verbal representations. Students will be able to identify maxima and minima of functions by analyzing the first and second derivatives. Business and economic models are utilized to demonstrate profit, loss, and consumer/producer surplus. Use of graphing calculators and application software are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Precalculus or Algebra II/Precalculus Honors — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3390 Calculus Honors

(Junior-Senior) This course incorporates Precalculus concepts with a calculus approach to lay the foundation for success in AP Calculus BC. It includes an analysis and exploration of limits and differentiation. Rate of change as a derivative is explored within related rates applications. Functions are modeled graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The connections between these different types of representations are emphasized. Solutions are analyzed for reasonableness, including relative accuracy and units of measurement. Students are expected to communicate mathematics both orally and in well-written sentences to explain problem solutions.

Prerequisite: Algebra ll/Precalculus Honors or Precalculus and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3403 AP Calculus AB

(Senior) This course is concerned with a multi-representational approach to the concepts of elementary calculus. Functional behavior is examined in a local and global perspective. The derivative is explored in terms of rate of change and local linear approximations. In the area of integral calculus, the topics explored include antiderivatives, techniques of integration, the definite integral and applications. The relationship between the derivative and the definite integral is explored through the fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The definite integral is explored both as a Riemann sum and as a net accumulation of a rate of change. Each of these topics is examined from a numeric, algebraic, graphic, and verbal perspective. The connections among these representations are also emphasized. The course prepares students for the AP Calculus AB College Board exam.

Prerequisite: Calculus Honors, Algebra II/Precalculus Honors, or Precalculus and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

3402 AP Calculus BC

(Senior) This course is concerned with a multi-representational approach to the concepts of elementary calculus. Functional behavior is examined in a local and global perspective. The derivative is explored in terms of rate of change and local linear approximations. In the area of integral calculus, the topics explored include antiderivative, techniques of integration, the definite integral and applications. The relationship between the derivative and the definite integral is explored through the fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The definite integral is explored both as a Riemann sum and as a net accumulation of a rate of change. Sequence and series topic deals with tests for convergence and power series. Additional topics include the study of vectors and parametric and polar functions in context of differentiation and integration. Each of these topics is examined from a numerical, algebraic, graphical and verbal perspective. The connections among these representations are also emphasized. The course prepares students for the AP Calculus BC College Board exam.

Prerequisite: Calculus Honors — 2 semesters — 1 credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgression-Math2020

Performing Arts

The mission of the of the Performing Arts Department is to foster the use of music, dance, and theatre as vehicles for creating, performing, responding and connecting to the bigger world.

Music

2701 Freshman Choir

(Freshman) Prior experience in a choral ensemble or previous musical instruction is desired but is not a prerequisite for enrollment. A student audition is also not required. The musical literature studied ranges from Renaissance to contemporary. Major performances will be presented each semester. Students are instructed in basic music reading and theory, and history and literature. Opportunities also exist for solo, ensemble, honor choir, and liturgical performance.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2708 Concert Choir I, II, III

(Sophomore-Senior) This is a performance class. Prior experience in a choral ensemble or previous musical instruction is desired but not a prerequisite. A student audition is also not required. The musical literature studied ranges from Renaissance to contemporary, and major performances are presented each semester. Students are instructed in basic music reading, theory, history, and literature. Opportunities also exist for solo, ensemble, honor choir, and liturgical performance.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2710/2711 Band I, II, III, and IV

(Freshman-Senior) This is a performance class open to wind and percussion instrumentalists. Prior experience is desired but not required for admission to the class. Beginning students will be recommended for private study outside of the class when necessary. Band functions as a marching organization during part of the fall semester and as a concert ensemble for the remainder of the year. Students enrolled in the class prior to the beginning of the school year will be informed of summer band activities. Opportunities exist for solo, ensemble, honor band/orchestra, and jazz band performance. Class is held at Jesuit College Prep from 7:00- 8:30 a.m. daily; students travel to Ursuline for the remainder of the school day. Band students must take both courses 2710 and 2711. In course 2710, the student can receive ½ credit Physical Education or ½ elective credit once PE requirements are met. In course 2711, the student can receive ½ credit Fine Arts or ½ elective credit once Fine Arts requirements are met.

Prerequisite: None —2 semesters — 1 credit

2712 Color Guard

(Freshman-Senior) Please see listing in Physical Education.

2713 String Ensemble I, II, III, and IV

(Freshman-Senior) This is a performance class of orchestral string instrumentalists. Prior experience is desired but not required for enrollment. Beginning students will be recommended for private study outside of the class when necessary. The class develops individual playing skills through the study and performance of a range of music literature. Performances are scheduled throughout the year and the string ensembles from Ursuline Academy and Jesuit College Prep periodically combine for rehearsals and performances. Aspects of music theory and history are presented in the study of specific compositions. Piano students are encouraged to enroll for the course as student accompanists. Opportunities exist for solo, ensemble, and honor orchestra performances.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters —1 credit

2714 AP Music Theory

(Sophomore-Senior) This course provides a sequential study of the elements of music including melody, harmony, texture, structure, and timbre through ear training, sight singing, and score analysis. Students will learn and demonstrate basic music theory concepts, both written and aural, including melodic and rhythmic notation, chord progression and harmonization of melody. This course is designed for only those sophomore-senior students who have previous musical training and experience. It does not provide the opportunity for creative expression.

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

Technical Theater

2743 Light and Sound Design

(Freshman-Senior) “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once they grow up.” --Pablo Picasso. This class will cover the basic principles of light and sound design. Students will have hands on experience with stage lighting, recording, and editing techniques. They will have the opportunity create and communicate their ideas through their own designs. Students are required to participate in at least five (5) extracurricular practicum hours for a UA production outside of class, and parent approval required to work with various shop tools under supervision. This course may be repeated one time for credit.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2745 Set Design and Stagecraft

(Freshman-Senior) “The world always seems brighter when you’ve just made something that wasn’t there before.” --Neil Gaiman. Set Design is the art of creating a complete environment in which a theatrical work can exist. It uses all elements of study to bring a world to life onstage. Students will have the opportunity to be creative with lights, sound, set, math, science, history, and visual arts while creating their own designs. They will have hands on experience with set construction and scene painting techniques. Students are required to participate in five (5) extracurricular practicum hours for a UA production outside of class and parent approval required to work with various shop tools under supervision. This course may be repeated one time for credit.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2761 Stage Makeup Design

(Freshman-Senior) This is an introductory course that studies the theory and practice of make-up design and its application for stage. Students will explore basic makeup principles, old-age makeup techniques, and fantasy makeup design, including the creation of special effects. Students will be applying make-up to themselves for majority of the classes. Students are encouraged to be a part of the makeup crew during the Ursuline main stage production. Parent approval is required to work with various shop tools under supervision.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2762 Introduction to Costuming

(Freshman-Senior) Interested in costume design but don’t think you can sew or draw? Don’t worry! Time and budget constraints challenge students to consider “conversion” costuming. This creative practical approach to costuming involves reimagining, recycling and reinventing rather than pattern drafting and construction. The emphasis in the course will be creative costume design. Elements of costume history and care will also be explored. Class will have practical experience by participating in costuming for Ursuline productions. Students are encouraged to be a part of the costume crew during the Ursuline main stage productions. Parent approval is required to work with various shop tools under supervision. This course may be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

Theatre Arts

2731 Introduction to Theatre

(Freshman-Sophomore) This is a one-semester class offering students an overview of the world of theater arts. Students will explore theatre history, design, and performance. An emphasis is placed on participation in activities encouraging community, creativity, and confidence, including using some class time to work on the school productions. Parent approval required to work with various shop tools under supervision.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2732 Fundamentals of Acting

(Freshman-Senior) This is a one-semester class designed to develop basic acting skills. Students will explore the fundamentals of acting through voice and body work, script and character analysis, and appreciation of various theories on the craft of acting. Students will use some class time participating in the mounting of the school productions Parent approval required to work with various shop tools under supervision.

Prerequisite: A semester of a theatre class or Instructor Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

2765 Improvisation

(Freshman-Senior) Fun and games? Creative and critical thinking? Improvisation is an accepted teaching and learning strategy applied to academic, scientific, and professional settings to improve communication skills, foster creative and critical thinking, and increase confident responses to unexpected challenges. Students will explore a variety of exercises and activities to develop creativity, confidence, and cooperation. Online, printed and multimedia resources will be incorporated in the exploration of the history, theory, and application of improvisation. Parent approval is required to work with various shop tools under supervision. This course may be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2739 Advanced Theatre Production

(Junior-Senior) This year-long course is designed for advanced students with previous theatre experience. Students will have opportunities to enrich understanding, and experiment with application of knowledge as they explore all aspects of theatre production, as well as explore some theatre history and literature. The cornerstone or culmination of this course will be a student production. Students will take responsibility for all production elements; play choice, directing, design, construction and other areas of participation necessary for a successful artistic collaboration. Students participating in this course must be available for a significant time commitment outside of class for meetings, rehearsals, and production work. Parent approval required to work with various shop tools under supervision. This course may be repeated once for credit. This class may be taken for a Pass/Fail option.

Prerequisite: Instructor Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2740 Musical Theatre

(Freshman-Senior) This semester-long course gives the student a crash course in musical theatre. The student will be exposed simultaneously to dance, acting, and vocal training. At the end of the semester, there will be a showcase for family and friends. This course may be repeated once for credit.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2733 Do Not Be Silenced: Playwriting

(Sophomore–Senior) If you have a love of theater and a love of words, try writing a play!  It’s one of the best and most powerful ways to find your voice and tell your story. The main focus is on writing our own creative pieces, but we will also be studying plays to learn techniques and structure.  Come explore the wonderful world of the playwright!  There is also the possibility of an end of course showcase.  Resist – do not be silenced.   

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2775 “All The World’s A Stage”

(Sophomore–Senior) This class will explore key styles and genres of dramatic literature and important texts in the development of theatre.  We will look at key moments in the history of Western theater and drama, focused on dramatic texts and their social and cultural contexts.  This theatre class is designed for those with an interest in theater and is not performance based.    This class is indispensable for the student wanting to pursue theatre in college. 

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

Dance

2719/2720 Dance I, II, III and IV

(Freshman-Senior) During this year-long course, students will be taught proper conditioning as well as correct dance movements and performance poise. Theory and practice will be combined to introduce the students to the principles and techniques of performing ballet, lyrical, musical theater, hip hop, jazz styles, and basic stage movement. In addition, the students will develop a working knowledge of dance vocabulary necessary for performance both as an individual and as a member of a dance company. Part of the discipline of dance includes appropriate rehearsal and performance wear which makes an enforced dress code essential for dance class. Appearance is important; students are expected to wear clean clothes to class to contribute to the pre-professional atmosphere. Dancers must provide their own shoes. Dancers will perform in 1-2 dance recitals each school year. The student must commit to these performances at the beginning of the year. Class attendance and promptitude are crucial for the class and part of the student’s grade. This is a zero-hour class that meets at 7:00 - 8:15a.m. on A Days or B Days. Some outside rehearsal time may be necessary. Dance students must take both courses 2719 and 2720. In course 2719, the student can receive ½ credit Physical Education or ½ elective credit once PE requirements are met. In course 2720, the student can receive ½ credit Fine Arts or ½ elective credit once Fine Arts requirements are met. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

Advanced Dance

2725/2726 Dance I, II, III and IV

(Freshman-Senior) This class is designed for those students with previous dance training. During this year-long course, students will be taught proper conditioning as well as correct dance movements and performance poise. Theory and practice will be combined to introduce the students to the principles and techniques of performing ballet, lyrical, musical theater, hip hop, jazz styles, and basic stage movement. In addition, the students will develop a working knowledge of dance vocabulary necessary for performance both as an individual and as a member of a dance company. Part of the discipline of dance includes appropriate rehearsal and performance wear which makes an enforced dress code essential for dance class. Appearance is important; students are expected to wear clean clothes to class to contribute to the pre-professional atmosphere. Dancers must provide their own shoes. Dancers will perform in 1-2 dance recitals each school year. The student must commit to these performances at the beginning of the year. Class attendance and promptitude are crucial for the class and part of the student’s grade. This is a zero-hour class that meets at 7:00 - 8:15 a.m. on A Days or B Days. Some outside rehearsal time may be necessary. Dance students must take both courses 2725 and 2726. In course 2725, the student can receive ½ credit Physical Education or ½ elective credit once PE requirements are met. In course 2726, the student can receive ½ credit Fine Arts or ½ elective credit once Fine Arts requirements are met. This course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: Students must audition for placement in this class — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2780 Beginning to Intermediate Tap

(Freshman–Senior) Tap is one of the oldest dance forms in this country. Students are taught rhythms, timing, and leg/foot coordination done to various types of music. We teach all types of tap from standard basics like “Singing in the Rain” to funky rhythm tap as seen in “Bring In Da Noise.” This class is open to all grade levels and can be taken as either for Fine Arts  or Physical Education required graduation requirement.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ Fine Arts credit or ½ PE credit

Speech

2201 Introduction to Speech

This one-semester course is designed to enhance the student’s ability to express her thoughts and feelings in a public venue with greater ease, clarity, efficacy, and confidence. Class content includes the essential elements of communication as well as the application of these elements for use in presentations. The student will prepare and deliver four to six major speeches as well as a number of impromptu speeches which will vary in scope and sophistication. Emphasis will be placed on preparation/writing of speeches, the critical thought process involved, and the development of executive presentation skills and techniques including the use and incorporation of current technological tools to enhance presentations.

*Note: This course does not satisfy the Fine Arts requirement. This class is required for the classes of 2021-2023.  It is not required for the class of 2024.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2785 Interpersonal Communication

(Freshman) Interpersonal Communication is the process by which people exchange information, feelings, and meaning through verbal and non-verbal messages: it is face-to-face communication.  This skill is one that many companies and corporations feel is missing in our current work force.  This one-semester course is designed to enhance the student’s ability to express her thoughts and feelings with greater ease, clarity, efficacy, and confidence. Class content includes the essential elements of communication, verbal and non-verbal, as well as the application of these elements for use in presentations.  

*Note: This course does not satisfy the Fine Arts requirement.   

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2709 Jazz Choir I, II, III, IV

(Freshman-Senior) This after school performance class is designed for students desiring specific knowledge and performance experience in jazz and contemporary music styles. Emphasis will be placed upon the history, literature, and vocal performance of twentieth century American jazz and related popular music. Students will develop a working knowledge of jazz style and technique, rehearse and perform literature in two, three, and four parts, both accompanied and unaccompanied, explore jazz improvisation, and study the history and representatives of the genre. The students will present public performances throughout the year. Class meets after school on Tuesday and Thursday during the year with elective credit awarded in the spring.

This course cannot be used to meet the Fine Arts requirement.

Prerequisite: Participation by audition only — 1 semester — ½ credit

8705 Rangerettes Drill Team

(Freshman-Senior) Please see listing in Athletics.

2750 Theatre Production

(Freshman-Senior) This after school class provides practical hands-on experiences in acting, singing, dancing, and stagecraft through the rehearsal and public performance of plays and/or musicals at Ursuline Academy. This opportunity for exploration, development, and synthesis of the elements of theatre is open to all grade levels. All attendance rules of the Academy apply even though the class meets after regular school hours. Each student is expected to read the Production Handbook and be familiar with all course requirements. A one-half graded elective credit per semester may be earned after a student completes 80 cumulative hours of satisfactory work in rehearsals and performance. This course cannot be used to meet the Fine Arts requirement but may be repeated for elective credit. This class may be taken for a Pass/Fail option.

Prerequisite: Participation by audition only — 1 semester — ½ credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgression-PerformingArt

Physical Education

The Physical Education Department believes in the importance of students gaining awareness, knowledge and skills essential for a healthy future.  The PE department believes that cultivating faith, community and resiliency are key components to developing the entire Ursuline student.

Note: All students must complete ½ credit of Wellness and ½ credit in one of the following:  Band, Color Guard, Dance, Rangerettes, Cheer, or one of the Athletic Sport teams offered by Ursuline Academy.

8132 Wellness

(Freshman-Sophomore) This course is designed to guide students throughout the many dimensions of Wellness (spiritual, physical, mental, emotional, occupational, and social) and provide an atmosphere to discuss and learn about how to live a healthy and stress-free life. Students will develop skills needed to maintain an active lifestyle, learn the importance of nutrition, and discover how to find a healthy balance of all facets of Wellness. Students will also engage in building essential skills needed to maintain optimal health while developing ways to promote healthy lifestyles in our diverse society. In addition, students will complete a course in Heartsaver CPR, Embody Love, Managing Stress, Teen Issues, Nutrition, and Fitness.

Prerequisite: None —1 semester — ½ credit

8230 Strength and Conditioning for Athletic Performance

(Sophomore-Senior) This course will teach athletes proper biomechanics and techniques for lifting and sport related movements. Athletes will learn the importance of proper lifting techniques to enhance athletic performance and prevent injuries. Athletes will start with basic body weight exercises and advance to plyometric and sport specific activities as the semester progresses. This class will be offered to complement the strength and conditioning programs of each sport at Ursuline, as well as offering a safe environment for students to increase their strength and conditioning if they do not participate in Ursuline Athletics. This course does fulfill the physical education credit requirement.

Prerequisite: Wellness —1 semester — ½ credit

8235 Sports Medicine

(Sophomore-Senior) This course provides an overview of the various fields of sports medicine and basic musculoskeletal anatomy. Students will learn about the evaluation, prevention and rehabilitation of sports injuries. Students will learn how to use training equipment and materials and learn up to date procedures for athletic training. Students will gain an understanding of current issues and events within the sport, athletic training, and medical community. This course will also provide students with the opportunity to shadow a medical professional. Student must complete the application process before acceptance into class. This course does not fulfill the physical education credit requirement.

Prerequisite: Wellness —1 semester — ½ credit

8245 Spinning 101

(Sophomore-Senior) Students will explore working their heart, lungs, muscles, and mind together in this fitness journey that applies real training principles of bicycle racing, in a non-competitive environment. In class, the students will participate in cycling and discover how the intensity of the workout is influenced by cadence, resistance of the bike’s wheel and the student’s body position on the bike. Typical workouts will include warm-up, steady up-tempo cadences, sprints, climbs, and cool-downs. This is a multi-level class and requires no outside cycling experience. This course does fulfill the physical education credit requirement.

Prerequisite: Wellness — 1 semester — ½ credit

8246 Fitness for Life

(Sophomore-Senior) This course will emphasize the importance of lifelong physical fitness. Students will explore a wide variety of activities that contribute to a healthy lifestyle by participating in sports, games, dance, circuit training, aerobic exercises, and meditation. This is a student-driven curriculum, based on the needs and interest of each class. This course does fulfill the physical education credit requirement.

Prerequisite: Wellness — 1 semester — ½ credit

8250 Mindfulness and Stress Management

(Sophomore-Senior) This course will teach students to evaluate stress triggers and how to handle them appropriately. Students will learn the basics of Mindfulness, Meditation, and Yoga as an active stress relief. The class will also learn and discuss other daily habits that influence stress such as sleep, nutrition, time management, and social media. Students will explore multiple stress management techniques and determine the ones that best fit their needs. Students will practice mindfulness, breathing exercises, or yoga for a portion of each class period as a way for students to de-stress and refocus. This course does not fulfill the physical education credit requirement.

Prerequisite: Wellness —1 semester —½ credit

8240 Yoga

(Sophomore-Senior) Yoga teaches basic postures and breathing exercises that derive from ancient India.  Students are encouraged to develop a greater body-mind alliance.  The combination of relaxation, general body toning, flexibility, and meditation gives the student an awareness of their enhanced human potential.  Concepts of yoga philosophy are discussed, which provides the basis for the practice of these techniques.  There is no prerequisite for this course.  This course does fulfill the physical education credit requirement.

Prerequisite: Wellness —1 semester —½ credit

2710/2711 Band I, II, III, and IV

See Performing Arts for description.

2712 Color Guard

(Freshman-Senior) This is a one-semester course working in cooperation with the Band class. Students are selected through an audition process held in May of the previous year. Class is held at Jesuit College Prep from 7:00-8:30 a.m. daily in the fall semester. Students travel to Ursuline for the remainder of the school day. After school practices may be scheduled throughout the semester. If the student intends to continue in Concert Band for the spring semester, she needs to sign up for Band. The student will receive ½ credit Physical Education the first year taken or can receive ½ elective credit once PE requirements have been met.

Prerequisite: Participation by audition only — 1 semester Fall — ½ credit

2719/2720 Dance I, II, III, IV: See Performing Arts page for description.

2725/2726 Advanced Dance I, II, III, IV: See Performing Arts for description.


Athletics

All athletic credits will be Pass/Fail. For the courses listed below, students can only receive a ½ credit of PE. Participation in additional seasons may be repeated for elective credit. A student cannot receive more than ½ credits per semester for Athletics. Students receiving PE credit for Athletics are required to follow the policies and procedures stated in the UA Student Handbook, as well as the rules and regulations stated in the UA Athletic Paperwork.

Note: Fall Sports which include Cross Country, Volleyball and Rangerettes will receive participation credit at the end of the Fall semester. Winter sports which include basketball, soccer, swim and Spring sports which include crew, golf, lacrosse, softball, tennis, track and field, Jesuit Cheer and Cistercian cheer will receive participation credit at the end of the  Spring semester.

Participation in additional athletic seasons may be repeated for elective credit.

8550 Fall Freshman Sports

(Freshman) In order to receive PE credit, the student-athletes must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last day of practice/competition. Freshman sport meeting this condition is volleyball. Student-athletes must meet requirements and criteria of the program regarding absences, competition, and uniform/equipment collection in order to receive credit.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

8555 Spring Freshman Sports

(Freshman) In order to receive PE credit, student-athletes must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last day of practice/competition. Freshman sport meeting this condition is basketball. Student-athletes must meet requirements and criteria of the program regarding absences, competition, and uniform/equipment collection in order to receive credit.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval 1 semester — ½ credit

8600 Fall Junior Varsity Sports

(Freshman-Junior) In order to receive PE credit, the student-athletes must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last day of practice/competition. Junior varsity sports meeting this condition are cross country and volleyball. Student-athletes must meet requirements and criteria of the program regarding absences, competition, and uniform/equipment collection in order to receive credit.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

8610 Spring Junior Varsity Sports

(Freshman-Junior) In order to receive PE credit, student-athletes must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last day of practice/competition. Junior varsity sports meeting this condition are soccer, basketball, swimming, softball, track and field, tennis, golf, crew, and lacrosse. Student-athletes must meet requirements and criteria of the program regarding absences, competition, and uniform/equipment collection in order to receive credit.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

8620 Fall Varsity Sports

(Freshman-Senior) In order to receive PE credit, student-athletes must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last day of practice/competition. Varsity sports meeting this condition are cross country and volleyball. Student-athletes must meet requirements and criteria of the program regarding absences, competition, and uniform/equipment collection in order to receive credit.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval —1 semester — ½ credit

8630 Spring Varsity Sports

(Freshman-Senior) In order to receive PE credit, student-athletes must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last day of practice/competition. Varsity sports meeting this condition are soccer, basketball, swimming, softball, track and field, tennis, golf, crew, and lacrosse. Student-athletes must meet requirements and criteria of the program regarding absences, competition, and uniform/equipment collection in order to receive credit.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

8705 Rangerettes Drill Tream

(Freshman-Senior) In order to receive PE credit, the student must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last required practice/event during the fall semester. Rangerette students must meet requirements and criteria of the program including but not limited to absences, performances, uniform/equipment collection and/or financial commitments in order to receive credit. The student will receive Pass/Fail designations at the end of the fall semester.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

8710 Cheer

(Freshman-Senior) In order to receive PE credit, the student must actively participate from the starting date of try-outs/practices to the last day of practice/competition in the spring. Activities meeting this condition are: Cistercian Cheer, and Jesuit Cheer. Students must meet requirements and criteria of the program regarding absences, performances and competitions in order to receive credit. The student will receive Pass/Fail designations at the end of the spring semester.

Prerequisites: Athletic Director and Coach Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgressionPE

Science

The Science Department offers interactive, relevant, and rigorous curricula that both challenge and engage students in the process of science. The curricula are designed to pique the student’s natural curiosity about science, train her to use scientific equipment, and encourage her to ask meaningful questions about scientific events occurring throughout the world, as well as in her daily life. Inquiry based science laboratory work encourages conceptual learning and development of problem-solving skills in each discipline. The ultimate goal of this department is to develop the individual student’s critical thinking skills, to enable her to become a scientifically literate citizen who embraces the challenges of working in a global society.

Note: Any student interested in double tracking needs to contact the Science Department Chair for the approval process.

4109 Physics I

(Freshman) This course is designed to introduce students to scientific inquiry through the study of mechanics. Students will develop problem-solving skills as they build graphical and mathematical models from their laboratory results. These models will then be used to explain and describe the world we live in. The emphasis of the course will be on linear motion, forces, energy, mechanical waves, momentum, projectile motion, and circular motion. Students will also develop laboratory skills using the scientific method and oral and written presentation of laboratory investigations.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4110 Physics I Honors

(Freshman) This course is designed to introduce students to scientific inquiry through the study of mechanics. Students will develop problem solving skills as they build graphical and mathematical models from their laboratory results to explain the world they live in. Students are expected to have a solid understanding of basic Algebra I concepts as the models developed will be applied to complex situations. The emphasis of the course will be on linear motion, forces, energy, and mechanical waves, as well as laboratory skills, the scientific method, and oral and written presentation of laboratory investigations.

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4221 Chemistry I

(Sophomore) This course is designed to provide a basic knowledge of chemistry. Topics studied include matter, energy, and the SI system of measurement, the periodic table, molecular structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical equations, stoichiometry, equilibrium and modeling the atom. Appropriate laboratory investigations accompany course units. Written laboratory reports and quarter reports are assigned throughout the year.

Prerequisite: Physics l — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4223 Chemistry I Honors

(Sophomore) This is an introductory laboratory course in chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the particle nature of matter, with special focus towards the role of energy in chemistry. Students will learn to analyze data and hone critical thinking skills rather than memorize a wide breadth of knowledge. Honors laboratory exercises emphasize great care in observation and measurement, the preparation of data tables and their interpretation. The Honors course requires special projects with written reports.

Prerequisite: Physics l Honors or Physics l with Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4328 Biology I

(Junior) This is an inquiry-based course that introduces students to the world of living things. The students will explore basic life processes at the molecular, cellular, systemic, organismal, and ecological levels of organization within the biosphere. Concepts from physics and chemistry will be integrated into the curriculum to better understand how organisms work at the cellular level. Interdependence and interactions within the environment will be examined and natural phenomena, such as energy and homeostasis, will be observed. The nature of science and how to correctly implement the scientific method will be emphasized regularly during inquiry-based labs.

Prerequisite: Chemistry l — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4329 Biology I Honors

(Junior) This is an inquiry-based course that will emphasize how living organisms work at the molecular and cellular levels. This class will build upon the models developed in physics and chemistry to better explain how a cell, energy, genetics, and homeostasis work within organisms. Interdependence of living things will be emphasized, and natural scientific phenomena will be observed and tested. Inquiry-based labs will be used to help students better understand how organisms operate, change, and interact in the complex biosphere over both the short and long term.

Prerequisite: Chemistry I Honors or Chemistry I with Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4211 Environmental Science

(Senior) This is a laboratory science course that introduces the student to the fundamental concepts and terminology of environmental science. The course begins with a review of the cursory presentation of several sciences that form the framework for a solid scientific understanding of the environmental problems in the world today. These include biology, ecology, chemistry, demography, and philosophy. Students are encouraged to discover and understand the interconnectedness of all the earth’s systems and the impact that each system has on the others. Students will perform controlled experiments, field studies and modeling in order to better understand the dynamics affecting the environment. Each student is expected to develop her own environmental perspective based on what she has learned in the course.

Prerequisites: Physics I, Chemistry I, and Biology I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4215 Geology, Meteorology, Oceanography (GMO)

(Senior) In Geology, Meteorology, & Oceanography (GMO), students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students study a variety of topics that include: characteristics and conditions of the Earth, including formation and history of the Earth, plate tectonics, origin and composition of minerals and rocks and the rock cycle, processes and products of weathering, characteristics of oceans, characteristics of the atmosphere, and the role of energy in weather and climate.

Prerequisites: Physics I, Chemistry I, and Biology I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4411 Anatomy and Physiology

(Senior) This course is designed to be a fast-paced class for seniors who are interested in health-related carriers, such as medicine, nursing, physical therapy, or athletic training. The goal of the course is to prepare students with necessary skills and knowledge to be successful in their future anatomy and biology classes in college. The environment in the class provides opportunities for analyzation of data through experiments, observation of tissues, construction of models, identification of interrelationships among body systems, and exploration of relationships between structure and function in the human body.

Prerequisites: Physics I, Chemistry I, and Biology I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4415 Engineering Design Innovation

(Senior) Students learn how engineers create, design, and test the technologies and devices of the 21st Century using math, science, computer science and creative skills. Students learn multiple problem-solving strategies including Design Thinking, the 6 D’s, and the Engineering Design Process. They use these ways of thinking to solve real-world problems, build prototypes, and test their solutions. Students learn from both regular classroom instruction and from hands-on design projects. Students spend 80% of instructional time conducting engineering field and laboratory activities. The activities include mechanical engineering (robotics, ballistic devices and drones), civil engineering (drafting, architecture and construction), systems and logistics, computer engineering (digital logic design, coding, and 3D printed structures) and biomedical engineering. Juniors receive one computer science elective credit. Seniors receive one computer science elective or science elective credit.

Prerequisites: Physics 1, Chemistry I, and Biology I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4432 Human Anatomy Honors

(Senior) This course examines the relationships between structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, sensory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Cat dissection and other laboratory experiments are performed, along with computer simulations of various physiological processes. There will be an emphasis on conditions of medical significance throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Physics I, Chemistry I, Biology I, and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4335 Physics II Honors

(Junior-Senior) This course is a continuation of Physics I and Physics I Honors and will complete the set of topics required for the SAT subject test in physics. The course is appropriate for students who have an interest in the physical sciences and may be considering a STEM or related degree in college. Topics studied will be fluids, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, waves, ray and particle models of light, quantum and nuclear physics, with a strong emphasis on laboratory investigation. Successful completion of Physics II Honors will provide a good foundation for students who plan to enroll in advanced college physics courses.

Prerequisite: Physics I Honors or Physics l with Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4533 AP Physics C: Mechanics

(Senior) This is a college-level Physics course restricted to mechanics, including kinematics and dynamics in one and two dimensions, energy, momentum, universal gravitation, rotation of rigid bodies, and simple harmonic motion. Its mathematical treatment requires Calculus, and it is equivalent to college level courses in calculus-based physics, the entry level course for those majoring in most STEM fields. Solving complex problems will be the norm in this course. Laboratory work involves equipment familiarity, experimental design and analysis of results in graphical, mathematical and conceptual formats. The course prepares students for the AP Physics C College Board examination.

Prerequisite: Physics I Honors or Physics I with Departmental Approval — Corequisite: Calculus Honors, AP Calculus AB, or AP Calculus BC — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4436 AP Chemistry

(Junior-Senior) This college-level course follows a stated curriculum submitted by the College Board for Advanced Placement. The course centers around six “big ideas” which include the structure of matter, bonding and intermolecular forces, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and chemical equilibrium. Students will develop a deep understanding of these big ideas through the application of seven science practices which are reinforced through a minimum of 16 hands-on lab investigations. Several of these lab investigations will be inquiry- based with guidance. The course is taken with the idea in mind that students will take the AP Exam to receive college credit equivalent to the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college.

Prerequisite: Chemistry I Honors or Chemistry I with Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4511 AP Biology

(Senior) This college-level Biology course follows a stated curriculum developed by the College Board for Advanced Placement to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills needed to understand and critically evaluate the unifying principles and rapidly changing issues of a biological science. Four overarching ideas, or themes, provide the main organizing structure of the course. These themes are evolution, cellular processes, genetics and information transfer, and ecology. Approximately 25 percent of instructional time is dedicated to laboratory investigations, including inquiry-based, student-directed labs. The reading load reflects that of a college level course, including a college approved textbook. Major research projects and case studies will be included. Students are expected to be independent learners concerning prerequisite material, and a summer project may be assigned to fulfill this requirement.

Prerequisites: Physics l, Chemistry l, Biology I and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4605 Medical Microbiology and Immunology

(Senior) This lab science course focuses on the classification, cell structure, metabolism, and historical concepts of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and protists. Methods of transmission and prevention and treatment of diseases caused by pathogenic organisms will be studied. Laboratory methods will include experimentation with pure cultures of microorganisms, staining techniques, culturing of bacterial stocks, antibiotic sensitivity testing, and diagnostic techniques including serological testing. This survey course also focuses on the study of the vertebrae immune system. Topics covered include general properties and development of specific and nonspecific types of immunity, the immune system in health and disease, antibody and antigen interactions, hypersensitivity, inflammation, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmunity, transplantation immunology, and vaccines. Laboratory activities will reinforce concepts and principles presented.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4615 Zoology

(Senior) Zoology is the study of animal life, including the relatedness of animals and their roles in their respective environments. The curriculum examines their anatomy and physiology, genetics, behavior, and ecology. Units include classification and phylogeny of the Animal Kingdom, the major animal phyla, and the role of zoos and Zoological Societies in conservation efforts. Lectures and class activities will provide fundamental information. Labs will include both microscopy and scientific dissections. Assessments will include written exams, lab practicals, and reports on a species from each phylum.

Prerequisites: Physics I, Chemistry I, and Biology I — 2 semesters — 1 credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgressionScience

Service Learning

The mission of St. Angela Merici emphasizes the importance of service to others as a lived reality. This department fosters this lived reality by giving students the opportunity to serve their community through service learning experiences.

9000 Service Learning Experience

(Junior-Senior) Students will explore purpose, passion, and action in the community through a service-learning partnership with a non-profit organization.  Through the development of students’ unique personal skills, creative interests, and academic endeavors, students will drive a service experience of their passion, building a solid partnership with a non-profit agency the student has sought out to serve.  Students will be active service leaders, investigating a service experience and community partner, preparing and implementing this service experience, and eventually demonstrating their work to community supporters. Using technology programs that allow for flexibility outside the classroom, the blended-learning format of this class will provide a foundation for communication with professionals across the Dallas metroplex and Teacher Service Mentors from Ursuline Academy of Dallas.  Furthermore, students will fulfill all their Serviam requirements for the year throughout this course.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

Social Studies

The Social Studies Department seeks to create independent thinkers and lifelong learners who will use the tools provided by a social studies curriculum to engage empathetically and ethically with the global community.

6130 World History

(Freshman)  This course examines the interaction and exchange of ideas and culture from ancient river valley civilizations to the modern world.  Students explore the influence of politics, art, religion, technology, and geography in the shaping of civilization.  Using a wide range of source materials and technological applications, students will develop essential skills that will build the foundation for future studies in history and the social sciences. This class is required for the class of 2024.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

6233 Modern World History: Renaissance through the Present

(Sophomore) This course focuses on the history of the world through the study of people, events and issues. Through the use of primary and secondary sources and with application of available technology, this course examines the impact of geographical, political, social/cultural, and economic factors on the contemporary world. This class is required for the class of 2023

Prerequisite: Early World History — 2 semesters — 1 credit

6212 Modern World History Honors: Renaissance through the Present

(Sophomore) This course encompasses major civilizations in a global context beginning in 1500 concluding with the onset of the Cold War. It challenges students to think in interregional contexts while focusing on the integration and evolvement of major historical themes. There is a marked focus on analysis of primary sources and class discussions. The course builds upon the freshman year’s ancient and medieval curricula. Students will develop a large historical written and oral vocabulary, write analytical essays, present individual and group research and improve their presentation skills. There is a continuous focus on perceiving world news viewed in historical context.

Prerequisites: Early World History and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

6333 United States History

(Junior) This course is a survey of significant American events from the Age of Colonization to the late 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the economic, political and cultural events that contributed to the formation of an American society that reflects pluralism. The rise to power of the United States is traced as well as its acceptance of global responsibility.

Prerequisite: Modern World History — 2 semesters — 1 credit

6303 AP United States History

(Junior) This course is a survey of significant American events and themes from Pre-Columbian America to present. Emphasis is placed on concepts, connections, and historical thinking skills outlined by the College Board. The seven themes are: identity, work, exchange, and technology, peopling, politics and power, America in the world, environment and geography, ideas, beliefs and culture. The course will follow how these themes have formed, changed and guided the history of America. In doing so, students will continue to develop the ability to think like a historian specifically honing: chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization, crafting historical arguments, and historical interpretation and synthesis. This course is designed to fulfill state requirements for high school graduation, while preparing the student for the AP U.S. History College Board Exam. In addition, the study of U.S. history provides the student with a better understanding of American’s role in an interconnected world.

Prerequisites: Modern World History Honors or Modern World History and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

6434 Government

(Senior) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of American government and politics, particularly the major institutions and processes. It also aims to develop students’ skills and abilities in analyzing and evaluating issues and public policies in American politics as well as the role of the United States on the world stage.

Prerequisite: United States History — 1 semester — ½ credit

6404 AP U.S. Government and Politics

(Senior) This course is an intensive study of the formal and informal structures of the US government and the processes of the American political system. Students will analyze the framework of government (the legislative, judicial, and executive branches), with an emphasis on policy-making and implementation. This course facilitates the preparation for the AP Government College Board Exam.

Prerequisites: AP United States History or United States History and Departmental Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

6435 Macroeconomics

(Senior) This course is the study of American society and the free enterprise system. Emphasis is placed upon how society uses its limited resources and produces, distributes and, consumes goods, and services in order to satisfy the unlimited wants of its members. General principles of economics are presented including theory of supply and demand, money and banking, and monetary and fiscal policies.

Prerequisite: United States History — 1 semester — ½ credit

6405 AP Macroeconomics

(Senior) This course gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. This course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price determination and also develops students' familiarity with economic performance measures, economic growth and international economics. This course prepares students to take the AP Macroeconomics College Board Exam.

Prerequisites: AP United States History or United States History and Departmental Approval — 1 semester — ½ credit

6603 AP Psychology

(Junior-Senior) This course is designed to examine the principles of human behavior, the challenges of human experience, and the universal aspects of our diverse global society. Additional topics considered include heredity and environment, motivation and emotions, cognition and language, social psychology, abnormal psychology, and intelligence. The course is also designed to prepare the student to take the AP Psychology Exam administered by the College Board each May. The study of Psychology offers useful insight into the behavior and mental processes of oneself and others. The study of the behavior of the individual correlates directly with the Ursuline core value, “respect for the uniqueness of the individual,” and the global nature of human culture and is an investment in the lifelong process of education.

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval —2 semesters — 1 credit

6401 AP European History

(Junior-Senior) This course will investigate significant individuals, events, and developments in European History from the late Middle Ages through the present day. Students will develop and practice skills employed by historians. Students will read extensively from primary and secondary sources, practicing evaluating historical arguments, making historical comparisons, and contextualizing events. In addition, students will analyze and contextualize works of art. This course will prepare students to take the AP European History Exam in May.

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval — 2 semester — 1 credit

6655 Inside Nazi Germany

(Sophomore-Senior): This course will focus on the central question of whether Nazism is a uniquely German experience or a potential danger to any highly developed society. We will examine reasons for Hitler’s rise to power, the nature and purposes of is dictatorship, the move toward war, and the genocide of racial ‘undesirables.’ Focus will be given to a series of central ideas and questions: Moving from the horrors and depravity of the First World War to an attempt at German democracy under the Weimar Republic, we will investigate the roots of German Nazism. Once the Nazis secured power, we will study the role of all aspects of German society under Nazi control. Were the Nazis inevitable in their conquest or could they have been stopped? Throughout the course, we will look at ordinary Germans, and eventually other Europeans, to see how they felt about and acted towards the regime. Why did Hitler start, and then expand, a war that was similar to the war Germany had just fought and lost a generation before? How did the Holocaust come about and why was so little done during the war, despite many governments and relief agencies knowing what was happening? Excerpts adapted from Dr. Donald Niewyk

Prerequisite: Early World History — 1 semester — ½ credit

6660 Personal Finance

(Junior-Senior) Just thinking about money makes people nervous, but does it really have to be that hard? This course will go in depth into how to understand money matters and make good financial decisions that will promote future economic well-being. The course will cover fundamentals of financial literacy such as credit, budgeting, saving and investing, banking, and taxes. Students will play a stock market game and learn essential knowledge for having a bright financial future. At age 35, this is the course all students wish they would have taken in high school!

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

6665 Introduction to Philosophy

(Junior-Senior): This elective course introduces students to philosophic questions and to how philosophers have approached and attempted to answer them. Students also grapple with the great questions of philosophy themselves, both individually and as part of a group. In other words, students both study philosophy and do philosophy. The course focuses on Western philosophy, but students receive assignments which allow them to explore philosophers and thought from any tradition. The course draws from multiple disciplines for material, perspectives, questions, and speakers.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

6670 From the Ottomans to ISIS: The United States and the Modern Middle East

(Junior-Senior) The goal of this course is to introduce students to the history, politics, and international relations of the modern Middle East from the end of the Ottoman Empire to the present.  The class begins with an introduction to religious and political Islam and proceed to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. The heart of the course covers interactions between the United States and the nations of the region.  Topics of study include the rise of Arab nationalism, Cold War geopolitics, U.S.-Israel relations, American interventions from the 1990s to the present, the 9/11 attacks, and the rise of ISIS.  The course strives to contextualize events by providing both Western and non-Western perspectives.

Prerequisite: United States History — 1 semester — ½ credit

6675 U.S. Protest Literature

(Junior-Senior) In perhaps one of the most famous social protest documents, Civil Disobedience, Henry David Thoreau reminds us that “unjust laws exist,” encouraging us to “let [our lives] be a counter-friction to stop the machine.” His assertion asks us: how do we confront injustice? This course will actively explore answers to this question through the history of United States protest literature, contextualizing it in the larger dialogue of U.S. History. As a class community, we will work to determine what defines protest literature: is it only a genre that criticizes society? Should it also, implicitly or explicitly, provide a solution? Is it a mode and style of social analysis? Texts will include a wide variety of genres, including prose, film, photography, poetry, and music, and student-driven issues could include environmentalism, education, civil rights, women’s rights, immigration, class, and individual conscience. And while protest literature has a long intellectual history, beginning with the Hebrew midwives, this class will focus on United States protest literature, from Thomas Paine to Tupac and beyond. Students will read primary sources and confront both current and historical issues. The class will include discussions, various forms of writing, and creative projects to provide students with opportunities to think and respond critically and analytically about what protest means to them, especially as global citizens committed to service and social justice.  

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ Social Studies credit  or ½ English credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgression-SocialStudies
First page of the PDF file: CourseProgression-SocialStudiesClass2024

Theology

The Theology Department shapes the atmosphere, structure, and spiritual culture of Ursuline Academy of Dallas so that it fosters the spiritual development and intentional discipleship of our students. Transmitting the Christian faith means to create in every place and time the conditions for a personal encounter of individuals with Jesus. As Pope Benedict XVI stated, “Being Christian is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction.” As teachers, we will walk with Christ in our ministry, both spiritually and academically, in order to inspire and engage each student’s faith journey.

7132 Revelation and Scripture (Freshman)

The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture: During the fall semester, students will delve into the Old Testament and see it come to life, as they experience God's Word in a personalized manner and discover Biblical inspiration and theological truths. Particular attention will be given to the overall scope of salvation history, divine authorship of Scripture, and God's unfailing relationship with His people which bridges the gap between the Old and New Covenants, leading up to the Christmas story.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester —½ credit

Who is Jesus Christ?: During the spring semester, students will journey throughout the New Testament, experiencing the living Word of God in the person of Jesus Christ. As the living Word of God and the second person of the Blessed Trinity, Jesus brings new meaning to the exploration of the Gospels. Themes covered include Jesus' infancy, ministry, miracles, parables, crucifixion, resurrection, and how the world has been forever changed.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

Both semesters are required to fulfill Theology requirement for Freshman year.

7232 Jesus, Salvation and the Church (Sophomore)

The Mission of Jesus Christ (The Paschal Mystery): Where does true happiness come from? How does what happened in the garden of Eden affect the world we live in today? Why did these events require the death and resurrection of the Son of God? How does God's becoming man ultimately reveal the depth of the Father's love for humanity? How does Jesus' earthly life 2,000 years ago serve as a model for us today? What does it mean to become a partaker in the divine nature? How does one follow Jesus and what does life look like after death? All these questions and more will be examined and answered in this course during the fall semester.

Prerequisite: Freshman Theology — 1 semester — ½ credit

Jesus Christ’s Mission Continues in the Church: The purpose of this course is to discuss and explore the following during the spring semester: Why did Christ establish the Church? Who were the first appointed leaders of the Church? How does the Holy Spirit lead and guide the Church today? How is the Church both human and divine? What are the models of the Church, and what are some examples of how the Church has lived them out in her 2,000-year history? How does the Church operate in the world today? Why would one want to belong to an organized religion?

Prerequisite: Freshman Theology — 1 semester — ½ credit

Both semesters required to fulfill Theology requirement for Sophomore year.

7335 Sacraments: Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ (Junior)

During the fall semester, this course guides students to better understand how Jesus is personally and visibly present in the actions of the sacraments. Students discover how the sacraments fulfill our human need for physical manifestations of the spiritual. The course ultimately aims at instilling the value of sacraments as tools to help us on our journey to heaven and as personal experiences of Christ's grace.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Theology — 1 semester — ½ credit

7336 Morality: Life in Christ

During the spring semester, this course aims at directing students to virtue as a path to true and lasting happiness. It challenges students to ask hard and honest questions concerning their actions and moral choices as young disciples living in the 21st century. At the end of this course, students should better understand the moral reasoning of the Church's teachings and how it applies to their own lives.

Prerequisite: Sacraments — 1 semester — ½ credit

Both semesters are required to fulfill Theology requirements for Junior year.

All Seniors are required to select two of the following:

7440 Living as a Disciple of Jesus Christ in Society

(Senior) Living as a Disciple prepares students for living in a just manner beyond graduation. The Christian understanding reveals that God desires a world in which all facets of life are guided by justice and charity. Jesus has called upon us to build his kingdom on earth. The Church, therefore, has been faithful to fostering a just and peaceful world. This course, integrating the learning of the past three years, uses the Gospels and Catholic Social Teaching to help students appreciate the richness of the Church's social mission. Topics to be addressed include the dignity of the human person, poverty, homelessness, older adults, discrimination, and ecology.

Prerequisite: Junior Theology —1 semester — ½ credit

7442 Ecumenical and Interreligious Issues

(Senior) The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the different major world religions and various Christian faith traditions. By engaging in a detailed study of the sacred writings and works of several world religions in addition to various Christian communities, the course will introduce students to diverse traditions, doctrines, cultures, and histories. Additionally, students will be exposed to the way these communities share similar beliefs with the Catholic Church. The course will also help students identify what common threads join humanity together in its search to understand God. Building on the foundational truth that Jesus Christ established the Catholic Church and entrusted to her the fullness of God’s Revelation, the course will help students to recognize the ways in which important spiritual truths can also be found in the varied Christian faith traditions as well as in the major world religions. This course is also intended to help them recognize the ways in which other systems of belief and practice differ from the Catholic faith.

Prerequisite: Junior Theology —1 semester — ½ credit

7444 Sacred Scripture

(Senior) The purpose of this course is to develop an appreciation and understanding of the principles found within Sacred Scripture. As a survey course, specific sections of the Old and New Testament will be presented in order to create an overview of the importance of Scripture study and its relationship to our faith life. The Old Testament will have an emphasis on the Pentateuch, historical books, prophets, and wisdom literature. The New Testament focus will be on a survey of the gospels and the letters of Paul. The course is designed to project a sense of unity between the Old and New Testament. The students will benefit from this course by learning about the history of salvation as it relates to our present-day faith experiences with our loving, merciful God.

Prerequisite: Junior Theology — 1 semester — ½ credit

7450 Church History

(Senior) Discover the epic story written over the past 2000 years, a story in which you have a part to play. Throughout this course, students will encounter the key figures of Catholicism and the impact their lives have had on the development of the faith handed on today. Students will analyze how Christianity is different from other world religions, examine evidence for belief in Christ, and explore the life and radical witness of the early Church. Opportunities are provided for students to directly interact with monks, have a firsthand encounter with Eastern rite Christianity, evaluate the blending of Church and State throughout the centuries, address the challenges and controversies, study the theology of sacred art and architecture, and learn from those saints of history whose lives and grace have carried over into our lives today. This is the family history of the Catholic Church, a Church both human and divine, and a story which begs the question, “What will your contribution be?”

Prerequisite: Junior Theology — 1 semester — ½ credit

7455 Responding to the Call of Jesus Christ

(Senior) The purpose of this course is to help students to understand the vocations of life: how Christ calls us to live. In this course, students will learn how all vocations are similar and how they differ. The course will be structured around married life, single life, priestly life, and consecrated life. Students will learn what it means to live life for the benefit of others and the value in considering a vocation in service to the Christian community. Because we serve young women at Ursuline, the course will highlight in a special way women’s consecrated life and single life. In the class we will explore how these two ways are lived out in the various orders and states in the Catholic Church and throughout the world.

Prerequisite: Junior Theology — 1 semester — ½ credit

7531 Peer Ministry and Liturgy

(Junior - Senior) In this year-long course, students will receive formation to cultivate and integrate their faith in daily life. Through the witness of their lives, peer ministers will be servant leaders, accompanying peers along the journey of faith, planning and serving in liturgies and prayer services, and deepening their own relationships with God. The course will include class discussions, planning sessions, some assigned readings, and an occasional written reflection. Grades are determined on a Pass/Fail basis and will be included on the transcript. Note: This course cannot be taken in place of Junior or Senior-level required Theology courses. Students may take this course in addition to their other classes.

Prerequisites: Application and Interview — 2 semesters — 1 credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgression-Theology

Visual Arts

The Visual Arts Department is committed to empowering students in the development of their own unique artistic voice. In addition, we encourage student agency in the visual arts and design to instill confidence in using the visual language of art in a diverse and changing world.

2538 Studio Art I: Drawing, Painting, and Design Foundations

(Freshman-Senior) In this class students develop an understanding of the elements of art: line, shape, color, value, form, texture, and space, as the fundamental building blocks for creating a work of art. Students focus on applying the elements of art in a wide variety of artistic challenges by engaging in sketchbook activities and creating works of art. These creative exercises support a working knowledge of each element and allow students to explore a variety of mediums and art forms including drawing, painting, and collage. Students complete the class with a portfolio of approximately four to five works of art. This hands-on art class is designed to benefit the beginning art student as well as challenge the advanced student. Completion of this class prepares students with a foundation of skill and vocabulary to proceed into any upper level art class.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2539 Studio Art II: Drawing

(Freshman-Senior) In this class, students develop skills in drawing from direct observation while exploring a variety of media including graphite, charcoal, chalk pastel, and colored pencil. Students continue to build their art vocabulary as they design artworks incorporating the elements of art learned in Studio Art I, and the principles of design: balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern and unity. Students demonstrate personal artistic voice in drawing subjects including still-life, portraiture, and mixed media abstraction. Students complete the class with a portfolio of approximately four finished works demonstrating purposeful connections among the form, content, and subject of their work. Class critiques, discussions, and analysis historical artists and art movements enrich students’ vocabulary and understanding of drawing. Completion of this class prepares students with the skills and confidence needed for taking Studio Art III: Painting.

Prerequisite: Studio Art I — 1 semester — ½ credit

2541 Studio Art III: Painting

(Sophomore-Senior) In this class, students explore a variety of painting mediums including watercolor, acrylic, and oil paint. Students engage in research and experimentation through sketchbook assignments to develop their own artistic voice. Students create individual project proposals pursuing their own concepts and ideas while demonstrating an understanding of formal concerns and exploring various approaches to painting from realism to abstraction. Students investigate both historical and contemporary artists and art movements as they continue to build on skills developed in Studio Art I and II to create a strong portfolio of artwork. Students completing this course develop the experience and technical skills necessary to succeed in Studio Art IV: Mixed Media Painting.

Prerequisite: Studio Art II — 1 semester — ½ credit

2542 Studio Art IV: Mixed Media Painting

(Sophomore-Senior) In the first quarter of this class, students learn advanced painting techniques and non-traditional mixed media painting processes. Students develop skills in using Adobe Photoshop as a method for generating ideas and developing sources of inspiration for their paintings. In the second quarter of this class, students focus on developing a body of three works of art with a centralized concept while focusing on developing a personal artistic style and voice. Various stylistic approaches may be explored from realism to abstraction along with a study of historical and contemporary artists and art movements associated with painting. Students completing this course develop the experience and technical skills necessary to prepare for AP Studio Art.

Prerequisite: Studio Art III — 1 semester — ½ credit

AP Studio Art

(Senior) This class is designed for highly motivated students who are committed to developing a college level portfolio of artwork. Advanced Placement Studio Art requires significantly more time than the other art classes to develop a portfolio of 15 artworks. Therefore, the program is intended for the invested and committed art student. Students will engage in investigation for their sustained investigation in the summer prior to taking the course. Students write an artist statement and create a personal website and digital art portfolio as part of the course. The course reflects two College Board portfolio requirements: 1) Sustained Investigation: 15 digital images that include works of art and design and process documentation, 2) Selected Works: Five actual works that best demonstrate the student’s understanding of and engagement with design. A digital slide portfolio (15 images of the student’s work) and five original pieces are submitted to the College Board for evaluation. Students in AP Studio Art will select one of the following portfolios during the first quarter of the school year:

2603 AP Studio Art: 2-D Design

2604 AP Studio Art: 3-D Design

2605 AP Studio Art: Drawing

Prerequisites: The equivalent of two credits of art and Departmental Application Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2549 Fused Glass

(Junior-Senior) In this class, students explore the ancient art form of fused glass. Students learn the proper process involved in stacking, or layering thin sheets of colored glass, to create their own artistic designs as they develop patterns or simple images. Students may choose to incorporate glass frits and liquid glass to enhance their designs. The stacked glass design is then fused by placing it inside an electric kiln and heating it until the design is fused into one piece. With this process, students may choose to create non-functional works of art or functional plates, bowls, and tiles. Students also learn to make glass beads using a propane torch and glass rods and then experiment with incorporating the beads into jewelry. Students will investigate the historical context and origin of this art form and discover how various cultures have embraced and defined the art of fused glass.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2575 Book Arts and Papermaking

(Junior- Senior) In this class, students explore the art and craft of making books with handmade paper. Artistic applications of handmade paper will be explored in various ways including constructing both utilitarian and artistic books, creating a unique watermark, and using handmade paper as a sculptural method by designing lightweight, sculptural installations. Students learn about papermaking throughout history and how this ancient technique can be applied to modern day art forms. Students also learn about the elements of art and the principals of design with special emphasis in color and unity.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2583 Screen Printing

(Freshman-Senior) In this hands-on studio art class, students learn the process of screen printing. Students learn how to squeegee ink through stencils to create beautiful works of art in multiples. The use of color, among other elements of design, is a hallmark of this process. Both hand-drawn and photographic imagery may be used as sources for creating these prints as students exercise creativity and broaden their art portfolio. Through demonstrations, lectures, and hands on assignments, students learn tools, techniques, and vocabulary associated with screen printing, and the rich history of this process.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2584 Relief and Engraving

(Freshman-Senior) In this hands-on studio art class, students learn two methods of printmaking — relief and engraving. Students learn how to carve a block and engrave a plate as they use a printing press to transform their own creative designs, drawings, and photographs into beautiful works of art, in multiple. The use of line, shape, and value, among other elements of design, are hallmarks of this process. Through demonstrations, lectures, and hands on assignments, students learn tools, techniques, and vocabulary associated with printmaking as they exercise creativity and broaden their portfolio. Students also learn about the contemporary use of relief and engraving, and its rich history.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2550 Ceramic Basics I

(Freshman-Senior) In this introductory class in the art of clay, students learn basic hand- building techniques in both additive and subtractive processes using the coil, pinch, and slab method of constructing to create a variety of functional and nonfunctional sculptures, objects, and vessels. Students are also introduced to the potter’s wheel and learn techniques for throwing an assortment of functional and sculptural forms. Through demonstrations and hands on assignments, students explore various methods of glazing and firing their work while learning the history of this ancient art form.

Prerequisite: None — 1 semester — ½ credit

2551 Ceramic Basics ll

(Freshman-Senior) In this class, students build and refine the throwing and hand-building skills learned in Ceramics I. Through demonstrations and hands-on assignments, students experiment with various methods of glazing and firing their work as they continue their study the historical development of ceramics.

Prerequisite: Ceramic Basics I — 1 semester — ½ credit

2552 Ceramics III

(Sophomore-Senior) In this class, students will build upon the basic skills learned in Ceramic Basics I and II. Students continue to construct more complex slab-building projects, further develop their skills in throwing on the potter's wheel, and experiment with making small glaze test batches. Students may also experiment with Raku firing. Students glaze and fire their work and continue their study of the historical development of ceramics.

Prerequisite: Ceramic Basics II — 1 semester — ½ credit

2553 Ceramics IV

(Junior-Senior) Students in this class continue to refine their skills on the potter’s wheel with the creation of more complicated forms that can be combined with hand-building techniques using the extruder and slab roller. Through self-directed projects, students develop a body of work that expresses their own artistic voice and style. Students study contemporary trends in ceramics while also learning to develop simple glaze calculations on the computer, assist in the loading and firing of the work, explore the Raku firing process at a more advanced level, and participate in art exhibitions.

Prerequisite: Ceramics III — 1 semester — ½ credit

2564 Digital Photography I

(Freshman-Senior) In this class, students learn to see photographically as they exercise creativity through exploration of the basic tools, techniques, and aesthetics of digital photography. Students learn to creatively use camera controls, exposure, and Adobe Photoshop for artistic purposes. Through lectures, demonstrations, assignments, and critiques, students gain creative control of the camera and Adobe Photoshop. Students learn about photography’s rich heritage, the elements and principals of design, and the printing and presentation of digital prints. Students are required to provide their own digital camera with manual shutter and aperture control. These cameras typically cost $400-$500.  If a student is unable to provide their own camera, a limited number of cameras are available upon request. Camera loans are conditional and students and parents sign an equipment responsibility agreement.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2565 Digital Photography II

(Sophomore-Senior) In this class, students build upon the knowledge and skills learned in Digital Photo I while exploring advanced photographic techniques and equipment in a variety of shooting situations. Students work to develop and express their own personal artistic vision and style through a variety of assignments. Students also continue to develop technical skills in Adobe Photoshop and participate in competitive photo exhibitions. Students are required to provide their own digital single-lens-reflex camera. If a student is unable to provide their own camera, a limited number of cameras are available upon request. Camera loans are conditional and require students and parents sign an equipment responsibility agreement.

Prerequisite: Digital Photography I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2570 Film Making l

(Freshman-Senior) In this class, students learn the basics of moviemaking by producing, directing, shooting, and editing their own short film. Students begin by developing an individual story concept, planning the project from concept to screenplay, scheduling and shooting the script on HD video, and learning to edit the visual story using a professional level non-linear editing program. In addition to learning how to edit footage in Adobe Premiere Pro software, students learn camera operation, lighting for movies, and sound recording techniques using the school’s video equipment. Various story genres are explored including scripted movies, documentaries, music videos, and more. Video cameras and film making equipment are loaned to students for the purposes of this class. Use of Ursuline equipment requires students and parents sign an equipment responsibility agreement.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2572 Film Making II

(Sophomore-Senior) Students who have successfully completed Film Making I may continue their film making studies in an independent study format with the goal of producing a collected body of their film work or “reel”. Advanced film techniques in shooting, lighting and editing are explored as well as special effects in Adobe After Effects software. This is a self-directed and project- based film production class for the motivated student who is interested in producing independent films or planning to study film further in college. Video cameras and film making equipment are loaned to students for the purposes of this class. Use of Ursuline equipment requires students and parents sign an equipment responsibility agreement.

Prerequisites: Film Making l and Instructor Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgressionVisualArt

World Languages

The World Languages Department is strongly committed to preparing students to engage and thrive in a multicultural world. Students acquire not only communicativeproficiency in the language of study but also knowledge,understanding, appreciation, and acceptance of other cultures.   

Note: Any student interested in double tracking needs to contact the World Language Department Chair for the approval process.

Arabic

1011 Arabic I

This course is an introduction to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA), a modernized version of the Literary Arabic. Students are introduced to spoken Arabic from Middle East and West. The class will give students an overview of Arabic language and culture, its alphabet and numbering system. Pronunciation and basic grammatical structures will be covered. This course will develop the necessary skills to acquire spoken and written communication skills at the Novice-Low proficiency level as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. It will also cover culture and traditions in order to familiarize students with the history and foundation of spoken Arabic. No previous study of Arabic is required.

Prerequisite: None —2 semesters — 1 credit

1012 Arabic II

This course continues to build on the language skills learned in Arabic I. Students are introduced to the technical aspect of the language (grammar). The course is designed to build and develop a stronger understanding of the Arabic language and its culture. It will further enhance the student’s ability to communicate in Arabic in the written and spoken forms. Students are expected to be at a Novice-Mid proficiency level as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. This course will work on improving the student’s confidence in reading and interpreting Arabic text and communicating with others.

Prerequisite: Arabic l —2 semesters — 1 credit

1013 Arabic III

This third-year course will continue expanding vocabulary, adding more grammatical structures, and exploring the Arabic culture and heritage. It will further strengthen overall language proficiency and cultural knowledge through more advanced vocabulary and structures. Students will develop presentational skills in compositions and presentations of social issues. This course addresses all four communication skills: reading, speaking, listening, and writing. Arabic III will enhance the student's ability to communicate in Arabic at a Novice- High level of performance as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages.

Prerequisite: Arabic II — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1014 Arabic IV

This fourth-year course is taught to develop an Intermediate-Low level of proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Using authentic sources such as newspapers, movies, and internet, students learn more complex structures and vocabulary to achieve proficiency in the listening, speaking, reading, and writing language skills. Students will learn Arabic history, geography, traditions and aspects of modern life to develop a deeper understanding of Arabic people and its culture. Students are given the opportunity to use all the skills learned in the previous levels through authentic projects (events, service, scrapbooks).

Prerequisite: Arabic III — 2 semesters — 1 credit

Chinese

1111 Mandarin Chinese l

This course provides an introduction to Modern Standard Mandarin Chinese and an overview of Chinese language and culture.  Students will learn pronunciation rules (pin yin) and tones, simple characters (both simplified and traditional characters will be introduced for recognition), vocabulary, and basic grammatical structures in order to develop the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing as beginners or at a Novice-Low level of proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. The course will provide the opportunity to develop an appreciation of Chinese traditions and people. In this course students begin to use the computer to type Chinese characters. No previous background in Chinese is required.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1211 Mandarin Chinese II

This course continues to build on the listening, speaking, reading, and writing language skills learned in Chinese l. Grammatical constructions will be reinforced, and new structures will be introduced. While many of the linguistic tasks will be like those of first-year Chinese, the language level required will be more advanced at a Novice-Mid level of proficiency, as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. In this course, students’ Chinese typing speed and accuracy will be trained.  By the end of this second year, students will be able to communicate basic needs in a Chinese-speaking community and read and/or write simple paragraphs.

Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1212 Mandarin Chinese II Honors

This course introduces new grammatical concepts and keeps building on the thematic vocabulary units introduced in level I. It continues to build on the language skills learned in Chinese I in order to advance to a Novice-High level of proficiency, as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. In this course, students will continue to train on their Chinese typing speed and accuracy. While this course will help students advance in the three communication modes, it focuses more on the presentational mode of communication. Students are expected to move at a fast pace and work with authentic materials to make the cultural connections as they work more on integrated performance assessments. Students are required to complete special projects. Participation in the annual Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK) is highly recommended.

Prerequisites: Mandarin Chinese I and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1311 Mandarin Chinese III

This course is designed to improve the development of the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. The main objective of the course is to provide students with enough vocabulary and grammatical structures so that they can communicate in the target language. The focus is to strengthen the overall language proficiency and cultural knowledge to advance to a Novice-High level of performance, as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Students will be trained on their typing skills while listening to Chinese content.  Students are required to complete special projects. Participation in the Annual Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK) is recommended.

Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese II — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1312 Mandarin Chinese III Honors

This course will continue expanding vocabulary, more grammatical structures and some authentic sources, such as Chinese story books, movies, and websites.  Students are expected to communicate using Chinese most of the time and accomplish the goal of reaching an Intermediate-Low level of proficiency, as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. In this course, students write both formally and creatively in Chinese. Students may also anticipate a variety of short presentations, selected standard based exams throughout the course. Students will be trained on their typing skills while listening to Chinese content. Participation in the annual Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK) is highly recommended.

Prerequisites: Mandarin Chinese II Honors and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1411 Mandarin Chinese IV Honors

In this course students are working towards the Intermediate-Mid level of proficiency, as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Using authentic sources from Chinese television, newspapers, movies, and websites, students learn advanced vocabulary and grammatical structures needed to achieve a higher level of proficiency in the listening, speaking, reading, and writing language skills. A variety of topics on Chinese history, geography, literature, traditions, and aspects of modern life will be addressed. This course also focuses on developing informal speaking and writing skills necessary to write emails and application letters, read short stories and advertisements, and exchange currency. With extra intensive language practice, some students may choose to take the AP Chinese Language and Culture test. Participation in the annual Chinese Proficiency Test (HSK) and/or special projects is required.

Prerequisites: Mandarin Chinese III and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

French

1121 French I

This course introduces students to the French language and culture while developing the communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Communication, acquisition of vocabulary, and basic structures are emphasized. French-speaking cultures around the world and their traditions are introduced. Students are working towards Novice-Low proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Participation in the annual National French Contest is required.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1222 French II

This course develops interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication in the French language within the context of exploring francophone cultures. It builds on the listening, speaking, reading and writing language skills learned in French I while developing the structures needed for communication. Students work with authentic materials to make cultural connections. Much of the class is conducted in French and students are expected to communicate in French. Students are working towards Novice-Mid proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Participation in the annual National French Contest is recommended.

Prerequisite: French I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1221 French II Honors

This course develops interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication in the French language within the context of exploring francophone cultures. It builds on the listening, speaking, reading, and writing language skills learned in French I while developing the structures needed for communication. Students work with authentic materials to make cultural connections. Most of the class is conducted in French and students are expected to communicate in French. Students are working towards Novice-High level of proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Participation in the annual National French Contest is required.

Prerequisites: French I and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1323 French III

This course further develops interpretive, interpersonal and presentational communication in the French language within the context of exploring contemporary issues in francophone cultures. It continues to build on the listening, speaking, reading and writing language skills learned in French II while building proficiency with grammatical structures needed for communication. Students work with authentic materials to make cultural connections.   The class is conducted in French and students are expected to communicate in French, working towards Novice-High level of proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Participation in the annual National French Content is recommended.

Prerequisite: French II — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1322 French III Honors

This course further develops interpretive, interpersonal and presentational communication in the French language within the context of exploring contemporary issues in francophone cultures. It continues to build on the listening, speaking, reading and writing language skills learned in French II Honors while building proficiency with the grammatical structures needed for communication. Students work with authentic materials to make cultural connections. The course is conducted in French and students are expected to communicate in French, working toward an Intermediate-Low level of proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Particular emphasis is placed on preparation for the AP World Language and Culture courses. Participation in the annual National French Contest is required.

Prerequisites: French II Honors and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1424 French IV

This course continues developing the skills needed to communicate effectively in French. Students will listen to, watch, read, discuss and critique traditional and contemporary cultural products such as music, film, news media and literature. Through daily discussions of the literary and cultural content, students gain confidence and competence in interpersonal communication. Students execute projects designed to display their improving communication skills and understanding of cultural topics covered in the course. Students are working towards Intermediate-Low proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages.

Prerequisite: French III — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1426 AP French Language and Culture

This college-level honors course emphasizes the use of French for active communication.  Within the context of the six AP Themes, students will work to understand, analyze, and synthesize authentic print, audio, and visual communications from across the francophone world, and engage in interpersonal and presentational written and oral communications on these themes.  This fast-paced course includes extensive practice in the organization and execution of writing, and proficiency and fluency in speaking.  Students execute projects designed to display their communication skills and understanding of cultural topics covered in the course.  Students will also learn strategies and practice skills in preparation for the AP French Language and Culture exam.  The course is conducted in French and students are expected to communicate in French, working towards an Intermediate-Mid level of proficiency or above as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages.  Students are encouraged to take the AP exam and are required to participate in the National French Contest.

Prerequisites: French III Honors and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

Spanish

1161 Spanish I

This introductory course is for non-heritage and non-native speakers. It introduces students to the Spanish language and culture while developing the communication skills of listening, speaking, writing, and reading. Interpersonal communication, acquisition of vocabulary and mastery of basic grammar concepts are emphasized. This course is conducted mainly in Spanish. Students are working towards Novice-Low level of proficiency or above as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. During the second semester, students take part in the annual National Spanish Exam. This course is a level one introductory course for students with no previous background; for all other students with Spanish background, a placement test is required.

Prerequisite: None — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1165 Spanish I Honors

Designed for students with some experience at the Novice level of Spanish proficiency, this class is a fast-paced review of the basic skills of language: listening, speaking, writing, and reading. This course is designed for highly motivated students who are interested in pursuing the Honors sequence. The class is conducted mainly in Spanish. Review and broadening of vocabulary and the mastery of basic grammar structures are emphasized. Students are working towards Novice-Mid proficiency level or above as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. During the second semester, students take part in the annual National Spanish Exam. This course is for non-native speakers; all heritage Spanish speakers must take the placement test in the spring.

Prerequisite: Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1262 Spanish II

This course continues to build the four language skills learned in Spanish I. Students continue developing the communication skills of listening, speaking, writing and reading at the Novice-Mid proficiency level or above as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. It introduces major and new grammatical structures of the language including the 3 verb moods: indicative, imperative and subjunctive. The class is mostly conducted in Spanish and students are expected to communicate using the target language. Practice of language skills through interpersonal communicative activities will be conducted on a variety of topics with emphasis on the Spanish-speaking countries and cultures.

Prerequisite: Spanish I — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1261 Spanish II Honors

This course introduces major and new grammatical structures of the language including the 3 verb moods: indicative, imperative and subjunctive. Students work on integrated performance assessments to develop their communication skills. Authentic and culturally driven materials are used. While the course will help students to advance in their communication skills, this class focuses particularly in interpersonal communication. The class is conducted mostly in Spanish and students are expected to communicate using the target language. Students are working towards Novice-High level of proficiency or above as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Participation in the annual National Spanish Examination and/or special projects is required.

Prerequisite: Spanish I and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1363 Spanish III

This course is designed to improve the development of the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. The main objective of the course is to provide students with enough pertinent vocabulary and grammatical structures so that they can communicate in the interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes. The focus is to strengthen the overall language proficiency and cultural knowledge to advance to an Intermediate-Low level of proficiency or above as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages.  The class is conducted mostly in Spanish and students are expected to communicate using the target language.

Prerequisite: Spanish II — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1361 Spanish III Honors

This course continues to develop the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the Spanish language. It focuses on communication strategies based on the AP World Languages thematic areas: families and communities, science and technology, beauty and aesthetics, contemporary life, global challenges, and personal and public identities. By the end of the year, students should be able to communicate with fluency, using new vocabulary and grammatical structures at an Intermediate-mid level of proficiency or above as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. The class is conducted in Spanish and students are expected to communicate in the target language.  Emphasis is placed in the history, art, culture and geography of Latin America and Spain.  Students are introduced to the major artists and authors of the Hispanic world. Participation in the annual National Spanish Examination and/or special projects is required.

Prerequisites: Spanish II Honors and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1464 Spanish IV

This course is designed to continue improving the development of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, with a conversational focus. The program aims to foster active participation of the students in the language and develop proficiency in communication. Students apply all grammar concepts previously learned that are essential to communicate effectively in every day real-life situations, and to discuss current events. The main objective of this course is to provide students with enough practice so that they can communicate in the three modes: presentational, interpersonal and interpretive. Spanish IV will prepare the students for the SAT subject Spanish test. The class is conducted in Spanish and students are expected to communicate using the target language. Students are working towards Intermediate-Mid proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages.

Prerequisite: Spanish III — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1466 AP Spanish Language and Culture

This honors course is equivalent to a college course in advanced Spanish composition and conversation. Several integrated performance assessments will be completed throughout the school year. The AP Spanish class emphasizes the use of Spanish for active communication; it encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course is structured around the six AP themes which are presented through authentic materials from the Spanish and Latin American world. Students are working towards Intermediate-High proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages. Students are encouraged to take the AP exam and will be required to take the annual National Spanish Exam.

Prerequisites: Spanish III Honors and Departmental Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1566 / 1566OLSG AP Spanish Literature and Culture

*This course is designed to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to that of an introductory college course in Spanish literature. It introduces the Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Hispanic literature. The class provides ample opportunities to further develop the student’s proficiencies across a full range of language skills. It gives special attention to critical reading and analytical writing and encourages students to reflect on the many voices and cultures of Spanish literature. Emphasis is placed on the study of literature through global, historical and contemporary cultural contexts. Students are encouraged to make interdisciplinary connections and explore linguistic and cultural comparisons. The course aims to help students to read with critical, historical and literary sensitivity. It exposes students to the methods of literary analysis, critical interpretation and evaluation. Students are working towards Advanced level of proficiency as defined by the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages.

Prerequisites: AP Spanish Language and Culture and Departmental and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

*Depending on enrollment this course might be offered only online




First page of the PDF file: CourseProgression-WorldLanguage

Online Courses (to be updated in January 2020)

OneSchoolhouse provides an exceptional all-girl and co-ed educational experience by connecting girls worldwide through relevant and engaging coursework in a dynamic online learning community. Guided by current research on how girls learn best, the School has dedicated itself to the following principles:

  • Emphasize connection among participants
  • Incorporate collaboration into the learning process
  • Inspire and reward creativity
  • Engage in real-world problems and applications while having students probe the social and ethical dynamics that define and stretch our global society.

Online courses require a great deal of self-motivation, discipline, and time management. Students who enroll in an online course will have an online instructor, not an Ursuline instructor. A designated Ursuline administrator acts as the liaison with the One Schoolhouse and shadows the progress of the students taking online courses. The Ursuline administrator monitors tests and periodically checks in with the students. The online course credit and grade will be reflected on the Ursuline transcript and included in the Ursuline GPA.

Students taking One Schoolhouse classes follow the calendar and due dates of One Schoolhouse. First semester is September through December and second semester is mid-January through the end of April. There is an extended winter break but no spring break. One Schoolhouse gives quarter grades along with projects/exams. There is no senior exemption with One Schoolhouse. There is no additional charge for these classes. Parents will receive an email showing the amount charged for the class, but this is not a bill. Ursuline pays for all charges. Failures follow Ursuline Academic policies.

Science

4922OLSG AP Environmental Science

(Junior-Senior) AP Environmental Science provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for preventing and/or resolving them. Students make real-world connections between the topics introduced in class and those in their own “backyard.” They participate in ethical discussions and collaborative projects designed to probe how different cultures and social structures affect the environment, and to explore potential solutions to today’s environmental issues. Students engage authentically and creatively with their classmates through a variety of discussions, activities, labs, and projects to investigate the real-world problems that face our environment today. They study our environment and work collaboratively to understand our role in it. Students taking this course are well prepared for the AP Environmental Science Exam in May.

Prerequisites: Algebra I and two years of high school laboratory Science and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4934OLSG AP Physics I

(Junior-Senior) AP Physics 1 is an Algebra-Trigonometry based, introductory college level physics course. The course is based on first semester introductory college physics and is designed for students planning to enter life science or pre-med programs in college. The goal of the course is to develop an understanding of physics through inquiry-based investigations. Students explore principles of Newtonian mechanics, work, energy, power, waves, sound, and simple circuits. Additional supplemental topics are covered that build understanding of the primary College Board curriculum. Developing the ability to reason qualitatively and quantitatively is a principal focus. Those skills are developed through the use of modeling, graphing, diagramming, unit analysis, symbolic algebra, and data analysis. Laboratory exercises are used to enhance the investigation of each topic. This course is intended to prepare students for the College Board AP Physics 1 Exam.

Prerequisites: Algebra II and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semester — 1 credit

4926OLSG Astronomy Co-ed Fall Semester

(Sophomore-Senior) The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the basics of astronomy, with particular emphasis on the role of astronomy in their everyday lives. Students will study the planets of our solar system; the sun and other stars; and galaxies and the universe. The course seeks to foster students’ innate curiosity in the unknown final frontier of space as humans boldly go forth in exploration. Students’ culminating projects will analyze the current state of space exploration, both manned and unmanned endeavors, as well as the search for life outside of our planet. By the end of this course, students will have an orientation for observing the night sky and a framework for understanding that which is beyond what we can see from our own speck of the universe.

Prerequisites: One year of high school level science and Personal Counseling Approval — Fall semester — ½ credit

4925OLSG Astronomy Co-ed Yearlong

(Sophomore-Senior) The objective of this course is to familiarize students with the basics of astronomy, with particular emphasis on the role of astronomy in their everyday lives. Students will study the planets of our solar system; the sun and other stars; and galaxies and the universe. The course seeks to foster students’ innate curiosity in the unknown final frontier of space as humans boldly go forth in exploration. Students’ culminating projects will analyze the current state of space exploration, both manned and unmanned endeavors, as well as the search for life outside of our planet. By the end of this course, students will have an orientation for observing the night sky and a framework for understanding that which is beyond what we can see from our own speck of the universe. Students wishing to pursue an astronomy research or design project in Semester II may enroll in the Research/Design Seminar.

For students continuing into Semester II, the course shifts into personalized, project-based work, where students engage in deep, sustained inquiry, authentic and iterative research, critical analysis, and rigorous reflection, revision, and assessment as they journey through a self-designed, long-term research or design project on the topic of their choosing. Guided by their One Schoolhouse teacher, students pursue individual study/self-assessment or collaborative seminar/peer-review. Pathway options from which students might choose include:

  • Spring Design Seminar: In this seminar, students design a solution to a real-world problem. Through the engineering design process/scientific method, students gather and analyze data to determine the effectiveness of their model or the accuracy of their hypothesis. Students may prototype and produce a public product in this seminar.
  • Spring Research Seminar: In this seminar, students answer a theoretical or ethical question. Utilizing the social science/humanities tools for source evaluation, students collect, critique, and evaluate artifacts or primary source documents to explore their thesis. Students may create a written, multimedia, or artistic product in this seminar.

Upon completion of their inquiry-driven project, students will have gained academic maturity and expanded their ability to engage in a diverse and changing world. They will be able to draw and defend conclusions from theoretical underpinnings, contextual background, and mathematical analysis or source evaluation. Finally, they will have created and tested something useful of their own design or will be able to defend a position based on their own research.

Prerequisites: One year of high school level science and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4914OLSG Engineering Fall Semester

(Sophomore-Senior) Engineers create things. They are the designers of the modern world. The works they create drive society forward. This course will introduce students to many engineering disciplines including civil, architectural, mechanical, electrical, aerospace, chemical, and biomedical engineering. Students will learn the engineering design process used by practicing engineers, create authentic engineering drawings, conduct a variety of hands-on projects, and consider the ethical issues within the field of engineering. Students will develop an array of specific skills including: applying the engineering design process to a specific problem, demonstrating originality and resourcefulness in their work, reflecting critically to improve creative efforts in problem solving, and viewing success as a cyclical process.

Prerequisites: One year of high school level science and Personal Counseling Approval — Fall semester — ½ credit

4910OLSG Engineering Yearlong

(Sophomore-Senior) Engineers create things. They are the designers of the modern world. The works they create drive society forward. This course will introduce students to many engineering disciplines including civil, architectural, mechanical, electrical, aerospace, chemical, and biomedical engineering. Students will learn the engineering design process used by practicing engineers, create authentic engineering drawings, conduct a variety of hands-on projects, and consider the ethical issues within the field of engineering. Students will develop an array of specific skills including: applying the engineering design process to a specific problem, demonstrating originality and resourcefulness in their work, reflecting critically to improve creative efforts in problem solving, and viewing success as a cyclical process. Students wishing to pursue an engineering research or design project in Semester II may enroll in the Research/Design Seminar.

  • For students continuing into Semester II, the course shifts into personalized, project-based work, where students engage in deep, sustained inquiry, authentic and iterative research, critical analysis, and rigorous reflection, revision, and assessment as they journey through a self-designed, long-term research or design project on the topic of their choosing. Guided by their One Schoolhouse teacher, students pursue individual study/self-assessment or collaborative seminar/peer-review. Pathway options from which students might choose include: Spring Design Seminar: In this seminar, students design a solution to a real-world problem. Through the engineering design process/scientific method, students gather and analyze data to determine the effectiveness of their model or the accuracy of their hypothesis. Students may prototype and produce a public product in this seminar.
  • Spring Research Seminar: In this seminar, students answer a theoretical or ethical question. Utilizing the social science/humanities tools for source evaluation, students collect, critique, and evaluate artifacts or primary source documents to explore their thesis. Students may create a written, multimedia, or artistic product in this seminar.

Upon completion of their inquiry-driven project, students will have gained academic maturity and expanded their ability to engage in a diverse and changing world. They will be able to draw and defend conclusions from theoretical underpinnings, contextual background, and mathematical analysis or source evaluation. Finally, they will have created and tested something useful of their own design or will be able to defend a position based on their own research.

Prerequisites: One year of high school level science and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4900OLSG Forensic Science

(Sophomore-Senior) Forensic Science examines the application of science to the criminal and civil laws enforced by the criminal justice system. Students explore the science of criminology by using a combination of science disciplines. As students learn to differentiate between actual techniques and some of those portrayed on popular television shows, they evaluate current procedures used by real crime labs to understand some of the limitations of the law, police, and forensics science. Students examine scientific techniques behind the analysis of physical and eyewitness evidence, toxicology, DNA fingerprinting, fire and explosives, bones, handwriting and document analysis, and other relevant pieces of evidence. Throughout the course, students investigate simulated crime and accident scenes, collect and analyze evidence, and develop observation skills and deductive reasoning. The course includes a study of the variety of careers in forensic science. This exploration is completed through a mixture of laboratory exercises, class discussions and projects, online simulations and games, and analysis of representation of forensic science in the media.

Prerequisites: One year of high school level science and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4915OLSG Marine Science

(Senior) Marine Science introduces students to oceanography through a review of earth science concepts, an investigation of physical and chemical ocean systems, the exploration of marine organisms and ecology, and the role of climate change in both marine and global systems. Students read and dissect scientific literature; integrate their knowledge of marine ecological systems into practical applications of science; and bridge connections between science, society, and political interests. Perhaps most importantly, students foster critical thinking skills and a keen understanding of the scientific process necessary to become well-informed and scientifically aware citizens, whether students’ futures directly involve marine science or not. Students learn through virtual and at-home laboratory exercises, scientific literature analysis; reading and video assignments, and research using online journals and current oceanographic data. This work is largely collaborative as students engage with the teacher and with their classmates on projects and labs. There is a significant emphasis on the application of creativity and innovation in dealing with environmental challenges.

Prerequisites: Biology l and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

4918OLSG Neuroscience

(Sophomore-Senior) In this project-based course, students learn the structure of the brain and how the brain senses, thinks, behaves, and creates memories for learning and language. They explore brain diseases, disorders, imaging techniques and treatments, as well as how the environment impacts the brain. Armed with this solid foundation in neuroscience, students spend the second semester learning to think like doctors. Students engage in group and individual research projects and seminar-style problem solving which will help to develop the ability to find answers to questions that may not be addressed specifically in the course. They review actual cases in the neuroscience field and follow the doctrine of ethical analysis with patients. Students are guided through a self-designed, long-term research project. This course is designed for students who are considering college majors in a medical or health related field; by the end of it, students will have a basic knowledge of Neuroscience.

Prerequisites: One year of high school level science and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit



Social Studies

6910OLSG AP Human Geography

(Sophomore-Senior) AP Human Geography is a yearlong course that addresses three basic questions: when? where? and why? Students interrogate sources regularly and build arguments that analyze region, diffusion, and sustainability - all with a goal of solving real world problems. The course emphasizes geographic models and their applications. Students compare case studies from around the globe to local and national situations to address complex scenarios, such as: How do geographers create models to understand and explain complex patterns in demography, migration, development, and the distribution of goods and people? How does globalization produce space-time compression? How does chain migration affect the distribution of ethnicities, languages, religions? What variables are likely to result in desired outcomes and unintended consequences when tackling a geographical challenge? Units of study include population, migration, culture, language, religion, ethnicity, political geography, economic development, industry, agriculture, and urban geography. Formative and summative assessments are modeled upon the format of AP tests and evaluate a student's skill development in five course competencies: remembering and understanding; contextual awareness; reasoning, analysis, and synthesis; communication skills; and independent and collaborative work. Students taking this course are well prepared for the AP Human Geography Exam in May.

Prerequisites: 1 year of Social Studies and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 elective credit

6906OLSG AP United States Government and Politics and AP Comparative Government and Politics

(Junior-Senior) AP United States Government and Politics and AP Comparative Government and Politics is a yearlong course that provides students with an in-depth understanding of the American government as well as various political systems around the world. The fall focuses on American government, including how different agencies within the government interact, and how these agencies and their policies affect the daily lives of Americans. The spring covers AP Comparative Government and Politics, which is an introduction to the methodology of comparative politics, and an in-depth look at six different states: Iran, Nigeria, China, Russia, Mexico, and Great Britain. Students will understand what factors contributed to the development of the American political system, and the structure of the United States government and the American political process. They will also recognize major comparative political concepts and how to apply them. Finally, students will be able to compare political institutions and processes from across the world, and to form sound conclusions based on those comparisons. This course prepares students for both AP exams in the spring.

Prerequisites: Departmental Approval and Personal Counseling Approval — Corequisite: United States History — 2 semesters — 1 credit

6905OLSG AP Macroeconomics

(Junior-Senior) AP Macroeconomics introduces students to major economic issues such as basic market analysis, the causes of the cycle of economic growth and recession, the problems of inflation and unemployment, the causes and consequences of federal budget deficits, and the causes and effects of international trade imbalances and currency fluctuations. Students analyze the impact of fiscal and monetary policies as well as the debates surrounding the implementation of each. This course involves extensive reading, problem-solving exercises, online discussions, and research and writing about contemporary macroeconomic issues. Multiple modalities are employed for content presentation so as to encourage personalization; assessment evaluates each student’s ability to utilize skill sets related to economic decision making. Strong reading, algebra, and analytical skills are necessary for success, as is strong motivation. AP Macroeconomics prepares students to become informed and thoughtful and will thoroughly prepare students to take the Advanced Placement exam in the spring. AP Macroeconomics is recommended for juniors and seniors.

Prerequisite: Algebra II, Departmental Approval, and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

6904OLSG AP Microeconomics

(Junior-Senior) AP Microeconomics is a course that examines how individuals (such as consumers and producers) make decisions and how these decisions affect our everyday lives. Topics discussed include the forces of supply and demand, costs of production, consumer choice, and behavioral economics, amongst others. Throughout the course, students examine various models that are used to conceptualize how our economy operates and explore the role that government plays in a given economy. Students analyze societal issues through the lens of economic reasoning and develop skills that promote time management and intrinsic motivation. Students complete collaborative projects, group discussions, problem sets, quizzes, and tests. The curriculum is developed to prepare students for the AP Microeconomics examination in May and is recommended for juniors and seniors with strong mathematical reasoning skills and an interest in finance, business, or government.

Prerequisite: Algebra II, Departmental Approval, and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 elective credit

6925OLSG Business and Economics Co-ed Fall Semester

(Junior-Senior) Business and Economics students gain fluency in foundational economic principles and explore business planning, development, and management. Students study the fundamentals of microeconomics, including supply and demand, incentives, pricing, and production, followed by macroeconomic concepts such as economic indexes, The Federal Reserve, and financial markets; as well as trade agreements and globalization. This is an ideal survey course for students considering a college degree in economics, business, or management. By the end of semester I, students will have a working foundation to analyze current events in the corporate world and the international economy.

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Personal Counseling Approval — Fall semester — ½ elective credit

6926OLSG Business and Economics Co-ed Yearlong

(Junior-Senior) Business and Economics students gain fluency in foundational economic principles and explore business planning, development, and management. Students study the fundamentals of microeconomics, including supply and demand, incentives, pricing, and production, followed by macroeconomic concepts such as economic indexes, The Federal Reserve, and financial markets; as well as trade agreements and globalization. This is an ideal survey course for students considering a college degree in economics, business, or management. By the end of semester I, students will have a working foundation to analyze current events in the corporate world and the international economy. Students wishing to pursue a research or design project in business or economics during semester II may enroll in the Research/Design Seminar.

For students continuing into semester II, the course shifts into personalized, project-based work, where students engage in deep, sustained inquiry, authentic and iterative research, critical analysis, and rigorous reflection, revision, and assessment as they journey through a self-designed, long-term research or design project on the topic of their choosing. Guided by their One Schoolhouse teacher, students pursue individual study/self-assessment or collaborative seminar/peer-review. Pathway options from which students might choose include:

  • Spring Design Seminar: In this seminar, students design a solution to a real-world problem. Through the engineering design process/scientific method, students gather and analyze data to determine the effectiveness of their model or the accuracy of their hypothesis. Students may prototype and produce a public product in this seminar.
  • Spring Research Seminar: In this seminar, students answer a theoretical or ethical question. Utilizing the social science/humanities tools for source evaluation, students collect, critique, and evaluate artifacts or primary source documents to explore their thesis. Students may create a written, multimedia, or artistic product in this seminar.

Upon completion of their inquiry-driven project, students will have gained academic maturity and expanded their ability to engage in a diverse and changing world. They will be able to draw and defend conclusions from theoretical underpinnings, contextual background, and mathematical analysis or source evaluation. Finally, they will have created and tested something useful of their own design or will be able to defend a position based on their own research.

Prerequisite: Algebra II and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 elective credit

6916OLSG Civics and Politics Fall Semester Co-ed

(Sophomore-Senior) We are part of many different communities that shape who we are and what we believe. This course provides students with opportunities to understand better how our society and political system shape their various identities. By exploring aspects of our identities and lived experiences, we evaluate how the concept of citizenship and the individual citizen work together to create the communities that we inhabit. From the launching point of the knowledge, values, and feelings we bring into the class, we uncover our own biases, explore the difference between fact and opinion, practice empathy, and learn to voice our own perspectives without silencing the perspectives of others. We investigate how power structures in our society, ranging from government to the media affect us. Students who take this course will leave with an increased understanding of our political system and society, the structural framework that shape our identities, increased empathy, and global awareness.

Prerequisite: Personal Counseling Approval — Fall semester — ½ elective credit

6915OLSG Civics and Politics Yearlong Co-ed

(Sophomore-Senior) We are part of many different communities that shape who we are and what we believe. This course provides students with opportunities to understand better how our society and political system shape their various identities. By exploring aspects of our identities and lived experiences, we evaluate how the concept of citizenship and the individual citizen work together to create the communities that we inhabit. From the launching point of the knowledge, values, and feelings we bring into the class, we uncover our own biases, explore the difference between fact and opinion, practice empathy, and learn to voice our own perspectives without silencing the perspectives of others. We investigate how power structures in our society, ranging from government to the media affect us. Students who take this course will leave with an increased understanding of our political system and society, the structural framework that shape our identities, increased empathy, and global awareness. Students wishing to pursue a civics or politics research or design project in semester II may enroll in the Research/Design Seminar.

For students continuing into Semester II, the course shifts into personalized, project-based work, where students engage in deep, sustained inquiry, authentic and iterative research, critical analysis, and rigorous reflection, revision, and assessment as they journey through a self-designed, long-term research or design project on the topic of their choosing. Guided by their One Schoolhouse teacher, students pursue individual study/self-assessment or collaborative seminar/peer-review. Pathway options from which students might choose include:

  • Spring Design Seminar: In this seminar, students design a solution to a real-world problem. Through the engineering design process/scientific method, students gather and analyze data to determine the effectiveness of their model or the accuracy of their hypothesis. Students may prototype and produce a public product in this seminar.
  • Spring Research Seminar: In this seminar, students answer a theoretical or ethical question. Utilizing the social science/humanities tools for source evaluation, students collect, critique, and evaluate artifacts or primary source documents to explore their thesis. Students may create a written, multimedia, or artistic product in this seminar.

Upon completion of their inquiry-driven project, students will have gained academic maturity and expanded their ability to engage in a diverse and changing world. They will be able to draw and defend conclusions from theoretical underpinnings, contextual background, and mathematical analysis or source evaluation. Finally, they will have created and tested something useful of their own design or will be able to defend a position based on their own research.

Prerequisite: Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 elective credit



Visual Arts

2916OLSG Art History

(Sophomore-Senior) Students in Art History examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from diverse cultures spanning 27,000 years. By investigating an image set of 250 works, students develop a contextual understanding of art history from a global perspective. Influences such as patronage, politics, class, belief systems, gender, ethnicity, and cross-cultural interactions inform students’ analysis of the style and content of art. Emphasis is placed on analytical and critical thinking skills, the language of art history, and the methods used by art historians to interpret art objects. Students experience, research, discuss, and write about art, artists, and art making. Upon completion of this course, students will have the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles as well as understand historical and cultural context.

Prerequisite: Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

2915OLSG AP Art History

(Junior-Senior) Students in AP Art History examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from diverse cultures spanning 27,000 years. By investigating an image set of 250 works, students develop a contextual understanding of art history from a global perspective. Influences such as patronage, politics, class, belief systems, gender, ethnicity, and cross-cultural interactions inform students’ analysis of the style and content of art. Emphasis is placed on analytical and critical thinking skills, the language of art history, and the methods used by art historians to interpret art objects. Students experience, research, discuss, and write about art, artists, and art making. Upon completion of this course, students will have the tools to recognize important works of art and historical styles as well as understand historical and cultural context. Students choosing the AP class are expected to delve deeper into the topics, take AP-style assessments, and prepare for the AP exam in the spring.

Prerequisite: Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit



World Language

1910OLSG Latin l Co-ed

(Sophomore-Senior) Beginning Latin is intended for students who have not previously studied Latin. The course develops competencies in reading and interpreting, as well as oral expression and aural comprehension. Students learn the foundational components and structures of Latin that allow them to develop basic reading strategies, which they use to build critical-thinking skills. By completing of this course, students will acquire proper pronunciation; essential grammar; the vocabulary to be able to understand and read short passages; the ability to engage in simple verbal exchanges; and a greater knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar. Students study Roman culture and history so they can examine the indebtedness of modern society to the Roman world, from legendary heroes to myths, gods, and politics. Students take quizzes and have tests, but they also write stories, sing songs, play games, and work together on short research projects to further understand how their developing knowledge of Roman culture applies to their own lives.

Prerequisite: Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1902OLSG AP Chinese Language and Culture Co-ed

AP Chinese Language and Culture provides deeper understanding and broader application of Chinese language and culture for advanced or heritage Chinese learners. This course focuses on applying Chinese language and cultural skills in real-world situations, and exploring a variety of topics in Chinese history, geography, music and arts, literature, daily life, and national and global issues. Students use team work, group online seminars, one-on-one conferences with the teacher, and a variety of engaging activities and experiential projects to meet individual needs. Students gain the high language proficiency and cultural competency to compare, examine, evaluate and solve conflicts successfully. Students may select the AP or Advanced Chinese track. AP students are expected to delve deeper into the topics, take AP-style assessments, and prepare for the AP exam.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chinese III; Departmental and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit

1566OLSG AP Spanish Literature and Culture Co-ed

The AP Spanish Literature and Culture course provides a college level survey of texts from Peninsular, Latin American and U.S. Hispanic authors. Students complete readings from the College Board required reading list, and analyze the works within their social, literary, and historical contexts. Students build an understanding of form, structure, theme and literary devices; they then analyze and evaluate the global interdependence that fosters the evolution of Hispanic and Latino literatures. The course is organized around the six themes designated by the AP curriculum framework and conducted entirely in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Spanish Language and Culture and Departmental and Personal Counseling Approval — 2 semesters — 1 credit



Online Summer Courses

One Schoolhouse provides an exceptional all-girl and co-ed educational experience by connecting girls worldwide through relevant and engaging coursework in a dynamic online learning community. Guided by current research on how girls learn best, the School has dedicated itself to the following principles:

  • Emphasize connection among participants
  • Incorporate collaboration into the learning process
  • Inspire and reward creativity
  • Engage in real-world problems and applications while having students probe the social and ethical dynamics that define and stretch our global society

Online courses require a great deal of self-motivation, discipline, and time management. Students who enroll in an online course will have an online instructor, not an Ursuline instructor.

Summer courses are intensive for-credit opportunities for ambitious students. Students participating in these courses should plan to devote 25 hours-30 hours per week for all eight weeks to their course. Students receive grades and comments in these classes, which are the equivalent of year-long, high-school level courses. Because of the pacing and intensity of for-credit summer courses, students must have the ability to login and complete work for their course daily; students must be available and have internet access from June 17th until August 9th – this is nonnegotiable! A designated Ursuline administrator acts as the liaison with the One Schoolhouse and shadows the progress of the students taking online courses. The Ursuline administrator periodically checks in with the students. The online course credit and grade will be reflected on the Ursuline transcript and included in the Ursuline GPA.

Calendar
Classes Start – June 17, 2019
Mid-term Grading Period Ends – July 12, 2019
Mid-term Report Published for Students and Parents – July 19, 2019
Last Day of Session – August 9, 2019
Final Report Published for Students and Parents – August 16, 2019

3933OLSG Algebra II Co-ed

(Junior) Algebra II forms the foundation for key concepts in advanced math courses. This course covers a full year of Algebra II in eight weeks by addressing algebraic functions and equations of lines and higher order polynomials; exponents and logarithms; rational expressions; absolute value; piecewise; and step. The course ends with an introduction to trigonometry beyond the right triangle. Students explore concepts directly through their own investigations, make and test conjectures about what they observe, and apply these conjectures to solve problems and create new conjectures. Assessments include tests and quizzes, discussion prompts, and group and individual projects. By the end of the course, students will have gained proficiency in critical thinking, pattern recognition, graphing, transformations, and communication.

Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry, Departmental and Personal Counseling Approval June 17th until August 9th — $1,555 — 1 credit

3914OLSG Pre-Calculus

(Junior-Senior) This course covers a full year of Pre-Calculus in eight weeks by addressing the algebraic and trigonometric concepts that lay the foundation for AP Calculus. Students graph and solve polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and apply these functions to model the relationship between different quantities in the real world. They explore the unit circle, solve trigonometric equations, and study abstract applications by proving trigonometric identities. Students then examine and apply algebraic representations of matrices, vectors, sequences and series, and conic sections by understanding the patterns and behaviors associated with these concepts. The course concludes with an introduction to calculus through limits. Students preparing for AP Calculus BC also have the option of studying polar coordinates, parametric functions, and derivatives. Students demonstrate mastery through traditional and alternative assessments, discussion prompts, reflection on their learning, group collaboration, and individual projects.

Prerequisites: Algebra II, Departmental and Personal Counseling Approval — June 17th until August 9th — $1,555 — 1 credit

6933OLSG United States History

(Junior) This course is a full year social science credit surveying the history of the United States of America. The course begins with an examination of America before Columbus. Having established an understanding of how Native Americans managed and used the land, the course turns to European conquest and colonial America, including how the stage was set for a plural and diverse modern America. The heart of the course centers around the themes of the American Revolution; the rise of democracy, the Republic, and the Constitution; the Civil War and Reconstruction; and how territorial expansion and industrialization laid the foundation for the movements and conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries. In order to develop a broad understanding of continuity and change in American history, students build a contextual understanding of the major events within each era while exploring political, social, cultural, economic, and religious trends in the United States. Through critical analysis, research and writing; collaborative activities; creative synthesis applications; and traditional and alternative assessments, students demonstrate understanding of cultural implications and historical context, and develop a chronological and thematic appreciation of American history.

Prerequisites: Personal Counseling Approval June 17th until August 9th — $1,555 — 1 credit

Summer Programs

Ursuline’s summer programs foster academic and personal growth through diverse academic and enrichment opportunities. Students can fulfill credit requirements, experience new cultures, and prepare for high school, college and future professions. Through a variety of credit and non-credit selections, Summer Programs students can explore their interests, strengthen their skills, and develop their talents. The types of summer learning opportunities offered by Ursuline Academy are:

Summer School

½ credit courses in an accelerated format

Summer Experiential Learning

Unique courses that blend academics with travel or work experience

Summer Workshops

Short, non-credit courses that prepare students for a successful school year

Summer Online Courses

Online courses in an accelerated format offered through One Schoolhouse for Ursuline credit


Summer Credit Courses

Ceramics: A Multi-Level Combined Course

This course is open to any student whether new or with experience in ceramics. Students on the beginning level will be introduced to the hand-building methods of Pinching, Coiling and Slab as well as an introduction to the wheel. Students with experience in clay will continue at their own level, incorporating more complex forms, sculpture and wheel work. All work will be glazed and fired, and the method of Raku firing will be explored.

2550S Ceramic Basics I: (Freshman-Senior) Prerequisite: None

2551S Ceramic Basics II: (Sophomore-Senior) Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

2552S Ceramics III: (Sophomore-Senior) Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

2553S Ceramics IV: (Sophomore-Senior) Prerequisite: Instructor Approval

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

6434S  Government

(Junior-Senior) United States Government introduces students to the fundamentals of American government and politics, particularly the major institutions and processes. It also aims to develop students’ skills and abilities in analyzing and evaluating issues and public policies in American politics as well as the role of the United States on the world stage.  This course will have some scheduled class meetings requiring students to be on campus, with the remaining course work being independent and collaborative online activities. To be successful in this course, students must be self-motivated and able to manage their time well. It is recommended that students speak with their Personal Counselor with questions about whether this course format is a good fit for them. Before beginning the course, students and parents must sign an Online Course Policy Agreement, outlining student expectations in this blended course format.

6/4-6/25; 12:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

2727S Hip Hop

(Freshman-Senior) Hip Hop is a high energy type of dance, originating from funk and street dance. This course focuses on different stylized techniques, rhythm, and isolations, teaching coordination, musicality and choreography.  This class is open to all grade levels and can be taken as either for Fine Arts credit or P.E. credit. 

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit Fine Arts or ½ credit PE

3631S Introduction to Computer Science

(Sophomore-Senior) This core semester course provides students with an introduction to computer architecture, networking and problem solving through programming. Using a high-level programming language, students learn how to read, modify, design, debug, and test algorithms that solve problems. Programming concepts include control structures, abstraction, modularity, and object-oriented design. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills to solve real-world problems. Relevance of computing to the student and society will be emphasized. Using a blended format, all students will meet in class on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and have Independent Workdays on Tuesdays and Thursdays to complete the online course work. Students with a course grade below 80, or with missing assignments, must attend class on Independent Workdays. It is recommended that students speak with their Personal Counselor with questions about whether this course format is a good fit for them. Students are expected to complete their other ½ credit of Computer Science requirement during the school year.

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

2201S Introduction to Speech

(Sophomore) This course is designed to allow the student greater ease and clarity in expressing her thoughts and feelings in public. Primary emphasis in the class is on delivery technique and critical thought process with secondary emphasis on speech writing. The student will prepare and deliver four speeches as well as additional impromptu speeches and group presentations. Using a blended format, all students will meet in class on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and have Independent Workdays on Tuesdays and Thursdays to complete the online course work. Students with a course grade below 80, or with missing assignments, must attend class on Independent Workdays. It is recommended that students speak with their Personal Counselor with questions about whether this course format is a good fit for them.

*Note: This graduation requirement is separate from other Fine Arts requirements and must be completed prior to junior year for the class of 2023.  This course is not required for the class of 2024.

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

7440S Living as a Disciple of Jesus Christ in Society

(Junior-Senior) Living as a Disciple prepares students for living in a just manner beyond graduation. The Christian understanding reveals that God desires a world in which all facets of life are guided by justice and charity. Jesus has called upon us to build his kingdom on earth. The Church, therefore, has been faithful to fostering a just and peaceful world. This course, integrating the learning of the past three years, uses the Gospels and Catholic Social Teaching to help students appreciate the richness of the Church's social mission. Topics to be addressed include the dignity of the human person, poverty, homelessness, older adults, discrimination, and ecology. Using a blended format, all students will meet in class on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and have Independent Workdays on Tuesdays and Thursdays to complete the online course work. Students with a course grade below 80, or with missing assignments, must attend class on Independent Workdays. It is recommended that students speak with their Personal Counselor with questions about whether this course format is a good fit for them.

6/5-6/25; 12:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

6435S Macroeconomics

(Senior) This course is the study of American society and the free enterprise system. Emphasis is placed upon how society uses its limited resources and produces, distributes and consumes goods and services in order to satisfy the unlimited wants of its members. General principles of economics are presented including theory of supply and demand, money and banking, and monetary and fiscal policies. This course will have some scheduled class meetings requiring students to be on campus, with the remaining course work being independent and collaborative online activities. To be successful in this course, students must be self-motivated and able to manage their time well. It is recommended that students speak with their Personal Counselor with questions about whether this course format is a good fit for them. Before beginning the course, students and parents must sign an Online Course Policy Agreement, outlining student expectations in this blended course format. This course will have a final exam.

6/4-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

7335S Sacraments: Privileged Encounters with Jesus Christ

(Junior) This course guides students to better understand how Jesus is personally and visibly present in the actions of the sacraments. Students discover how the sacraments fulfill our human need for physical manifestations of the spiritual. The course ultimately aims at instilling the value of sacraments as tools to help us on our journey to heaven and as personal experiences of Christ's grace. Using a blended format, all students will meet in class on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and have Independent Workdays on Tuesdays and Thursdays to complete the online course work. Students with a course grade below 80, or with missing assignments, must attend class on Independent Workdays. It is recommended that students speak with their Personal Counselor with questions about whether this course format is a good fit for them.

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

2761S Stage Makeup Design

(Freshman-Senior) This is an introductory course that studies the theory and practice of make-up design and its application for stage. Students will explore basic makeup principles, old-age makeup techniques, and fantasy makeup design, including the creation of special effects. Students will be applying make-up to themselves for majority of the classes. Students are encouraged to be a part of the makeup crew during the Ursuline main stage production. Parent approval is required to work with various shop tools under supervision.

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

8132S Wellness

(Freshman-Sophomore) This course guides students throughout the many dimensions of Wellness (spiritual, physical, mental, emotional, occupational, and social) and provides an atmosphere to discuss and learn about how to live a healthy and stress-free life. Students will develop skills needed to maintain an active lifestyle, learn the importance of nutrition, and discover how to find a healthy balance of all facets of Wellness. Students will also engage in building essential skills needed to maintain optimal health while developing ways to promote healthy lifestyles in our diverse society. In addition, students will complete a course in Heartsaver CPR, Embody Love, Managing Stress, Healthy Behaviors, Nutrition, and Fitness.

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

Summer Experiential Learning

Students apply directly to each of these programs, which are not part of the Summer School Course Request process. Please email the contact person for each program about its application deadline. Travel programs have minimum and maximum enrollment limits.

2570S Photography in Arizona

(Sophomore-Senior) This is a one-week trip in Arizona and Utah to see and photograph some of the most amazing sites on earth.  This class is focused on beginners but is ideal for advanced-level photographers as well.  We will see Grand Canyon, Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon and so much more.  With personal instruction from Mr. Thompson, your camera will become a creative tool for your self-expression; as we answer the question, what makes a good photograph?  We will fly to Phoenix and rent a van for short, mid-day drives to each location, preserving the early and late hours for shooting.  Staying in hotels, we will travel the huge physiographic region known as the Colorado Plateau.  With Dr. Moody’s guidance, we will learn the geology of these landscapes and how they were sculpted over millions of years.  The fun includes red-rock hiking, Navajo culture, shopping, and general merriment. Students provide their own camera, but some loaners are available.  Enrollment is limited to 8.  Grades for this course will be posted at the end of the  Fall semester. Applications due: January 31, $500 deposit due February 15.          

Prerequisite: Completed application form and approval
For Information: contact Bill Thompson, Photography teacher, wthompson@ursulinedallas.org
On Campus: Monday, 7/6, 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for camera orientation and travel meeting
Travel: 7/10 – 7/16 (7 days)
$1,850 all-inclusive ($500 deposit) — ¼ Fine Arts credit

Summer Study Abroad: Caen, France

(Sophomore-Senior) Come explore Paris and the Normandy region, study at the University of Caen, and live with a host family, experiencing France like never before!  This two-week summer study abroad class immerses students in the French language and culture. Students travel, study and improve their language ability and cultural knowledge with classes, excursions, and experiential learning activities led by University of Caen and Ursuline faculty, and facilitated by API, a study abroad organizer for high schools and colleges. In addition to on-site coursework, students will write blog entries, create a video, and submit a captioned photo to reflect upon their experience in France. Grades for this course will be posted at the end of  the Fall semester. This class may be repeated once for elective credit.

Prerequisite: One year of French at UA, completed application form and approval
For Information: Contact Amy Gilchrist, French teacher, agilchrist@ursulinedallas.org
Travel: 6/30- 7/16 (17 days)
$5,200; all-inclusive ($500 deposit) — ½ elective credit and Université de Caen certificate

Summer Study Abroad: Nazi Germany and Church History in Germany & Poland

(Junior-Senior) Come explore Munich, Nuremburg, Germany and Krakow, Poland! We will walk though centuries old churches, visit the Shrine of the Black Madonna, and delve deeper into Church history, in addition to exploring sites that are central to the 13-year history of Nazi Germany, such as the Nuremberg Party Rally sites, Dachau concentration camp, Auschwitz-Birkenau, and spots critical to the rise of Nazi Germany in Munich and Krakow. The trip will take the students’ classroom learning on site where they will see the history firsthand. Additionally,  students will have an opportunity to delve into the current culture and sites of Poland and Germany. Students will be expected to do on-site coursework, write blog entries, create a video, and submit a captioned photo to reflect upon their experience in Germany and Poland. A final project will be due before the beginning of the Fall semester. Grades for this course will be posted in the following Fall semester.

Prerequisite: Completed application form and approval
For Information: Contact Jason Surmiller, Theology teacher, jsurmiller@ursulinedallas.org; Jeff Girard, Social Studies teacher, jgirard@ursulinedallas.org; Olivia Ide, Social Studies teacher, oide@ursulinedallas.org
On Campus: 6/1-5
Travel: 6/8-19
$5000 all-inclusive ($500 deposit)½ Theology credit and ½ Social Studies elective credit 

Summer Study Abroad: Salamanca, Spain

(Sophomore-Senior) Come explore Madrid and the Castile-Leon region, study at the University of Salamanca, and live with a host family, experiencing Spain like never before!  This two-week summer study abroad class immerses students in the Spanish language and culture. Students travel, study and improve their language ability and cultural knowledge with classes, excursions, and experiential learning activities led by University of Salamanca and Ursuline faculty, and facilitated by API, a study abroad organizer for high schools and colleges. In addition to on-site coursework, students will write blog entries, create a video, and submit a captioned photo to reflect upon their experience in Spain. Grades for this course will be posted in the following Fall semester. This class may be repeated once for elective credit.

Prerequisite: One year of Spanish at UA, completed application form and approval
For Information: Contact Roxana Casco, Spanish teacher, rcasco@ursulinedallas.org
Travel: 6/29-7/15 (17 days)
$5,200 all-inclusive ($500 deposit)½ elective credit and 2.5 hours University of Salamanca college credit

Ursuline Academy Student Internship Program

(Senior) This program offers personal development, life-skills mentoring and career awareness through practical experience. These are UA researched and authorized summer internships with Dallas area professionals, many of whom are Ursuline alumnae. Internships are available to rising Seniors and take place between June 1 and August 16, 2020, prior to the senior year. Interested juniors sign up for an individual meeting with the director of the internship program and are matched with internships in the spring of 2020. To earn acknowledgment on transcripts, interns must complete a minimum of 60 hours of internship service, maintain a journal, write a thank you to the mentor, and complete an online evaluation at the conclusion of the program. Completed journals, thank you notes, and evaluations must be submitted to the director of the program no later than August 23, 2020 to qualify for transcript acknowledgement.

Prerequisite: Completed online Internship application and approval
For Information: Contact Christian Freberg cfreberg@ursulinedallas.org.
Internship: 6/1–8/16; Assignment due by August 23, 2020
$250 (non-refundable)Non-credit

Summer Workshops

Keep your mind fresh, build skills, and get ahead this summer with Summer Workshops. These short format, non-credit classes offered in June and August focus on essential skills and equip students with tools for success in the coming academic year. Workshop details, dates, and registration information may be found on the Summer Programs page of the Ursuline website.


Freshman Summer Programs

Ursuline’s Freshman Summer Programs are designed to help students get the best possible start to high school. Summer Workshops prepare students most effectively for their first year at Ursuline, giving them the opportunity to acclimate, meet future teachers and classmates, sharpen skills, and fill curriculum gaps. Freshman Summer School courses are a great way for students to experience their first high school credit class.

2550S Ceramics Basics I

This course is open to any student whether new or with experience in ceramics. Students on the beginning level will be introduced to the hand-building methods of Pinching, Coiling and Slab as well as an introduction to the wheel. Students with experience in clay will continue at their own level, incorporating more complex forms, sculpture and wheel work. All work will be glazed and fired, and the method of Raku firing will be explored.

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

2727S Hip Hop

Hip Hop is a high energy type of dance, originating from funk and street dance. This course focuses on different stylized techniques, rhythm, and isolations, teaching coordination, musicality and choreography.  This class is open to all grade levels and can be taken as either for Fine Arts credit or P.E. credit. 

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

2785S Interpersonal Communication

Interpersonal Communication is the process by which people exchange information, feelings, and meaning through verbal and non-verbal messages: it is face-to-face communication. This skill is one that many companies and corporations feel is missing in our current work force. This one-semester course is designed to enhance the student’s ability to express her thoughts and feelings with greater ease, clarity, efficacy, and confidence. Class content includes the essential elements of communication, verbal and non-verbal, as well as the application of these elements for use in presentations. *Note: This course does not satisfy the Fine Arts requirement.   

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

2761S Stage Makeup Design

This is an introductory course that studies the theory and practice of make-up design and its application for stage. Students will explore basic makeup principles, old-age makeup techniques, and fantasy makeup design, including the creation of special effects. Students will be applying make-up to themselves for majority of the classes. Students are encouraged to be a part of the makeup crew during the Ursuline main stage production. Parent approval is required to work with various shop tools under supervision.

6/4 – 6/25; 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit

8132S Wellness

This course guides students throughout the many dimensions of Wellness (spiritual, physical, mental, emotional, occupational, and social) and provides an atmosphere to discuss and learn about how to live a healthy and stress-free life. Students will develop skills needed to maintain an active lifestyle, learn the importance of nutrition, and discover how to find a healthy balance of all facets of Wellness. Students will also engage in building essential skills needed to maintain optimal health while developing ways to promote healthy lifestyles in our diverse society. In addition, students will complete a course in Heartsaver CPR, Embody Love, Managing Stress, Healthy Behaviors, Nutrition, and Fitness.

6/5-6/25; 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. or 12:45 p.m.-3:45 p.m. — $475 — ½ credit